For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 8: KOREAN DRAMA VIEWERSHIP and HABITS

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 8 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4,  Part 5 , Part 6, and Part 7 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Lee Minu and Chong Heup Cho. (1990/2003). Women watching together: An ethnographic study of Korean soap opera fans in the United States. In Gail Dines and Jean M. Humez (eds.) Gender, race  and class in media. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. 

Kim, Youna. (2002). Women, television and everyday life: Korean women’s reflexive experience of television mediated by generation and class. Thesis, University of London.

Park, Jung-sun. (2004). Korean American Youths’ Consumption of Korean and Japanese TV Dramas and Its Implications. In Koichi Iwabuchi (Ed.) Feeling Asian Modernities: Transnational Consumption of Japanese TV Dramas.  Pp. 275-300. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Park, Sora. (2004). China’s Consumption of Korean Television Dramas: An Empirical Test of the “Cultural Discount” Concept’, Korea Journal 44: 265–90.

Han, Kyung-Koo. (2006). From housewives to butterflies: Hallyu and the fantastic journey to Korea. Korea Journal, 46(2): 269-274.

Kwon, Dong Hwan. (2006). Is it too early to talk about “Hallyu” in the Phillipines? Koreanovela and its reception among Filipino audience. Cultural Space and Public Sphere in Asia

Shim D. (2006). Korean women television viewers in Singapore. Cultural Space and Public Sphere in Asia. 

Kim, Dae Do and Su Na Mi. (2007). Consuming Korean TV Dramas in China: Analysis of a new cultural flow, “Hanryu”, in the Asian context. pp. 233-261.  

Lin, Angel and Avin Tong.  (2007). Crossing boundaries: male consumption of Korean TV dramas and negotiation of gender relations in modern day Hong Kong. Journal of Gender Studies, 16(3): 217-232.

Shim, D. (2007). Korean wave and Korean women television viewers in Singapore. Asian Journal of Women’s Studies, 13(2): 63-82.

Hirata, Yukie. (2008). Touring ‘Dramatic Korea’: Japanese women as viewers of Hanryu dramas and tourists on Hanyru tours. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 143 – 156.. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press. (see also, Tourism)

La Torre, Nichole S. (2008). Hallyu: Discourses of Korean drama viewership in China. Thesis. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/bitstream/handle/10125/20412/M.A.CB5.H3_3489_r.pdf?sequence=2

Kim, Do Hyun et al. (2009). Television drama, narrative engagement and audience buying behavior: The Effects of Winter Sonata in Japan.The International Communication Gazette, 71(7): 1-17. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://utminers.utep.edu/asinghal/Articles%20and%20Chapters/Kim-Singhal-et-al-2009-Winter-Sonata-0purchasing-behavior-Gazette-1.pdf 

Lee, Soobum and Hyejung Ju. (2010). Korean television dramas in Japan: Imagining “East Asianness” and consuming “nostalgia.” Asian Women, 26(2): 77-105. 

Chan, Brenda. (2011). Of prince charming and male chauvinist pigs: Singaporean female viewers and the dream-world of Korean television dramas. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(3): 291-305.doi: 10.1177/1367877910391868

Hung Jen Su, Yu-An Huang, Glen Brodowsky & Hyun Jeong Kim. (2011.) The impact of product placement on TV-induced tourism: Korean TV dramas and Taiwanese viewers. Tourism Management, 32(4): 805-814.

Hien, Phan Thi Thu. (2012). Feminitive attraction of Hallyu (Korean Wave) in Southeast Asia. University of Social Sciences. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://en.hcmussh.edu.vn/3cms/?cmd=130&art=1344907879368&cat=1329473737740

Lee, Sangjoon. (2012). From diaspora to Drama Fever: Consuming Korean dramas in North America. Presented at the Nam Center for Korean Studies’ Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media Symposium. (Watch video of this presentation)

Chuang, Lisa M. & Hye Eun Lee. (2013). Korean wave: enjoyment factors of Korean dramas in the U.S. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 37(5): 594-604.

Kuotsu, Neikolie. (2013). Architectures of pirate film cultures: encounters with the Korean wave in “Northeast” India. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 14(4): 579-599.

Yoo, Jae-woong, Samsup Jo, and Jaemin Jung. (2014). The effects of television viewing, cultural proximity, and ethnocentrism on country image. Social Behavior & Personality: an international journal, 42(1):89 – 96. 

Happy Reading!

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 7: IDENTITY & NATIONALISM

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 7 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4,  Part 5  and Part 6 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Lee,  D.  Y.  (2004,  March).  A  typology  of  East  Asian  popular  culture  and  Korea’s nationalism.  The  paper  presented  in  the Asian  Culture  Symposium.  Seoul:  Korea. 

Lee, Hee-Eun. (2005). Othering ourselves: identity and globalization in Korean popular music, 1992-2002. Thesis, University of Iowa.

James, David E., Marsha Kinder, Stanley Rosen, Eunsun Cho. (2006). Transnational modernity, national identity, and South Korea melodrama (1945-1960s). Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/item/etd-Cho-20061114.pdf 

HyeJung, J. (2007). The nature of nationalism in the “Korean Wave”: A framing analysis of news coverage about Korean pop culture. Presented at the 93rd National Communication Association Conference. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/1/8/7/9/2/pages187925/p187925-1.php

Siriyuvasak, Ubonrat & Hyunjoon Shin. (2007). Asianizing Kpop: production, consumption and identification patterns among Thai youth. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 8(1): 109-136 

Cayla, Julien and Giana M. Eckhardt. (2008). Asian brands and the shaping of a transnational imagined community. Journal of Consumer Research, 35 (2): 216 – 230. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://www.juliencayla.com/JCR%20final.pdf

Sung, Sang Yeon. (2008). Globalization and the regional flow of popular music: the role of the Korean wave (Hanliu) in the construction of Taiwanese identities and Asian values. Thesis, Indiana University, Bloomington. 

Yang, Fang-chih Irene. (2008). Rap(p)ing Korean Wave: National identity in question. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 191- X. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press.

Blitz, Brian. (2009). Blood, birth, imagination: ethnic nationalism and South Korean popular culture. Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed 7 December 2016 from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/rws_etd/document/get/bgsu1245256858/inline

Cho, Young Chul. (2009). Security, nationalism and popular culture: Screening South Korea’s uneasy identity in the early 2000s. East Asia, 26(3): 227-246.

Crieghton, Millie. (2009). Japanese surfing the Korean wave: Drama tourism, nationalism, and gender via ethnic eroticisms. Southeast Review of Asian Studies, 31: 10-38. Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://www.uky.edu/Centers/Asia/SECAAS/Seras/2009/SERAS_2009.pdf#page=36 

Shin, Hyunjoon. (2009). Reconsidering Transnational Cultural Flows of Popular Music in East Asia: Transbordering Musicians in Japan and Korea Searching for “Asia.” Korean Studies, 33(1): 101-123. 

Kim, Pil Ho and Hyunjoon Shim. (2010). The birth of “Rok”: Cultural imperialism, nationalism and the glocalization of rock music in South Korea, 1964-1975. East Asia Cultures Critique,18(1): 199-230. 

Cho, Younghan. (2011). Desperately seeking East Asia amidst the popularity of South Korean pop culture in Asia. Cultural Studies, 25(3): 383-404. doi: 10.1080/09502386.2010.545424 

Joo, Jeongsuk. (2011). Transnationalism of Korean popular culture and the rise of “pop nationalism” in Korea. The Journal of Popular Culture, 44(3): 489-504. 

Kim, Gwangseok. (2011). Practicing nationalism: culture, technology and national identity in contemporary Korea. Thesis, University of Texas at Austin. Accessed 22 November 2011 from http://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/bitstream/handle/2152/ETD-UT-2011-08-4267/KIM-THESIS.pdf?sequence=1

Kim, Youna. (2011). Diasporic nationalism and the media. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(2): 133-151.

Sutton, R. Anderson. (2011). “Fusion” and questions of Korean cultural identity in music. Korean Studies, 35: 4-24. 

Sung, Sang-Yeon Loise. (2012). The role of Hallyu in the construction of East Asian regional identity in Vienna. European Journal of East Asian Studies, 11(1): 155-171.

Ho, Swee-Lin. (2012). Fuel for South Korea’s “Global Dreams Factory”: The desires of parents whose children dream of becoming K-pop stars. Korea Observer, 43(3): 471-502.

Yoo, Jae-woong, Samsup Jo, and Jaemin Jung. (2014). The effects of television viewing, cultural proximity, and ethnocentrism on country image. Social Behavior & Personality: an international journal, 42(1):89 – 96. 

Han, Gil-soo. (2015). K-pop nationalism: Celebrities and acting blackface in the Korean media. Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, 29(1): 2-16.

Happy Reading!

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만나서 반갑습니다: Let KPK Introduce You To…

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

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BTS is pleased to meet you!

Korean popular music includes many genres – Jazz, Hip-Hop, Rock, Rhythm & Blueseven Ska and Bossa Nova. One of the reasons Kpop is so addictive and has continued its growth globally is because, despite language differences, the music seems so familiar to its listeners, particularly for non-Asian audiences. Fuhr (2015) writes, “K-pop producers strongly follow the formulaic production standards set by Western mainstream pop songs…, but they combine all the well-known elements in a way that audiences in the East and West equally seem to receive as refreshingly new but also familiar.” (pp. 238-239)

Not only do Korean producers strive to mix (and remix) Eastern and Western musical elements, they work closely with Western singer/songwriters and producers or purchase western-based music tracks for use by Korean artists (Note: purchasing tracks is a popular practice in the global music industry. Demo tracks, guide vocals, backing vocals are some terms you can search to learn more).

KPK members have noted that Kpop fans may not be familiar with why many songs sound familiar to them. This realization was crystallized when TVXQ released their strong R&B balladBefore U Go,” (2011) which includes a partial guitar riff from the Isley Brother’s songVoyage to Atlantis(1977) – many people, instead, could only reference Chris Brown’s song “Take You Down” (2008)  – which still echoes the musical composition of the aforementioned Isley Brothers song. Moreover, recognition gaps go beyond music composition to include singing styles, choreography, and song instrumentation or arrangement. Additionally, we’ve found that such oversights are glaring in academic literature, which overwhelmingly focuses on K-pop music as a political tool or economic commodity (Lee 2008, Jang & Paik 2012, and see this bibliography).

The “Let KPK Introduce You To…” blogpost series hopes to help Kpop fans discover links between what they hear in Kpop songs (or see in Kpop promotions) and the recent history of American music and popular culture – from a particular song or a musician’s vocal runs to costuming, training, dancing, or overall presentation.  The primarily audio/visual – and brief – blog posts will open with the K-pop artist song,concept, or performance and then readers will be introduced to the “why it sounds familiar” song, concept, or performance. The entry will end with brief biographical or explanatory text of the “original” artist, sound, idea, or concept. Simple right?

Part lay ethnomusicology and part historiography, the series offers a gateway for music enthusiasts to contextualize the foundation and development of Kpop music, and for critics to move beyond discussions of cultural appropriation in K-pop and toward the more likely premise of global creative collaboration.

If you’ve ever heard or seen a Kpop song, dance, styling, or presentation  and and thought “that sounds like/looks like/feels like/reminds me of…,” this series is for you! Look forward to it.

Sources

Fuhr, Michael. Globalization and popular music in South Korea: Sounding out K-pop. New York: Routledge. (2015).

Jang, Gunjoo & Won K. Paik. Korean wave as tool for Korea’s new cultural diplomacy. Advances in Applied Sociology, 2(3): 196-202. (2012).  http://file.scirp.org/Html/22229.html (16 June 2016).

Lee, Keehyeung. Mapping out the cultural politics of the “Korean Wave” in contemporary South Korea. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 175 – 189. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press. (2008).

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It’s a K-pop Thing(Link)….

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

You’ve finally convinced a friend/co-worker/parent/spouse/transit-seat partner/random stranger that your favorite group is worth taking a closer look at, and *gasp* they’ve asked a K-pop Fan Gateway Question (while feigning nonchalance): “which one is [member]”?

As a K-pop fan, you already know this game: such a question is already an indication that the questioner would like to know more…way more. But you don’t want to overwhelm them with information – rather, just give them a comprehensive overview of the group or member. You know…to “satisfy” (read: further ignite) their “casual” curiosity. To prepare for this moment – and help emerging K-pop fans everywhere – what can you do? Where can you send them?

Try ThingLink.

ThingLinklogo
Make K-pop artist overviews featuring websites, videos, and more using ThingLink.

ThingLink is a web and mobile application that allows its users to create interactive images and videos for use in social media, on websites, and more. Users can augment photos with links to websites, videos, audio, and more.   After images/videos are posted to ThingLink, community users can search for images and “Touch” (like) other interactive images and videos, too.

If you make ThingLinks for several groups from different entertainment companies, consider organizing them by Channels – a feature in ThingLink. You can also decide what you want everyone to see by choosing if your TLs will be public or private. One drawback: if you want browsing users to locate your work, you’ll need to make a title that has the search term(s) you think people will use since ThingLink doesn’t really make use of traditional hashtags as a finding aid.

ThingLink is free and also offers expanded options for different fees. It is available on Google Play and the App Store!

Here’s a ThingLink I made for …well, you know…(drag your mouse over the image to interact with it):

Enjoy!

P.S. Taemin is on second left. You know, in case you were wondering…casually. 🙂

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“I don’t know what they’re saying!”: Resolved with Flitto

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

OK, so you’re a Kpop fan who:

1. “Sings along” with Kpop songs (“sing along” = mostly hums, singing all of the English words and the occasional saranghae/su itge/mumcheo obso words or phrases that stand out…

2. Follows Kpop idols on social media even though you can barely read Hangul

3. Want to know what your Kpop idols are saying when they post to social media sites…

Well, KPK has discovered THE app/website for you:

Flitto!

Try Flitto to access translations of what your favorite Kpop artists are posting or saying on popular social media sites.
Try Flitto to access translations of what your favorite Kpop artists are posting on popular social media sites.

Flitto is a global language translation social media site. Users can join (for free!), pick their native language, and then follow people who post messages. Other users who can translate will transcribe any messages. And get this: sometimes the messages are not just in print! Super Junior-M’s Henry has posted recordings of his conversations with SHINee’s Taemin and EXO’s Xiumin. Below the recordings you’ll see the transcribed conversation in English (along with the Flitto user who transcribed the exchange).

Other Kpop Idols appearing on this awesome site include:

  • G-Dragon
  • Lee Minho
  • Kim Heechul
  • SHINee’s Onew, Jonghyun, and Key
  • Jay Park
  • Tablo

Is your idol there? Check out Flitto to finally understand all those messages they left for you!

Flitto is also available on Google Play and iTunes (cost: free!)

#digitalhallyu: Mindomo X Hallyu

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD

Associate Professor of English, Longwood University

At KPK, we receive frequent requests for information from people want to get up to speed on Hallyu quickly, but do not have much familiarity with Hallyu as a cultural movement. So, Kaetrena Davis Kendrick and I used Mindomo, a web-based mind-mapping tool, to create a visual of the basics of Hallyu, or the Korean Wave.

http://www.mindomo.com/mindmap/333bdeca3a5141aeb0a34e2f01bbb556

I chose Mindomo because it was fairly easy to use, with a low learning curve. We created our mind map using the free version of the service. It allowed us to organize well-known elements of Hallyu, like K-pop, K-drama and Korean film, and show the complexity through the use of sub-categories with text boxes and links.  For example, the general public may be aware of K-pop (thanks, Psy), but the mind map allows them to see other aspects of K-pop, including creative personnel, K-pop media, and fandoms. The mind map also allowed us to represent other significant aspects of Hallyu, such as the impact of technology as well as political, economic and academic implications.

We like Mindomo because it allowed us to show the relationship between concepts in Hallyu in a visual way. It also provided a way to convey basic yet comprehensive information about Hallyu, which can be daunting for newbies. Best of all, Mindomo generates a shareable link, so that it can also function as a resource. We hope that people will use our Hallyu schematic, and, as always, cite us when they do.

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 5: GENDER and SEXUALITY

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 5 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3  and Part 4 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

GENDER and SEXUALITY

Cho, Eun Sun. (2005). The stray bullet and the crisis of Korean masculinity. In N. Abelmann and K. McHugh (Eds.), South Korean Golden Age Melodrama. pp.99-116. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

Hilts, Janet Flora. (2006). Seo Taiji 1992-2004: South Korean popular music and masculinity. Thesis, York University.

Jung, Sun. (2006). Bae Yong-Joon, hybrid masculinity & the counter-coeval desire of Japanese female fans. Particip@tions 3(2). Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.participations.org/volume%203/issue%202%20-%20special/3_02_jung.htm

Lin, Angel and Avin Tong. (2007). Crossing boundaries: male consumption of Korean TV dramas and negotiation of gender relations in modern day Hong Kong. Journal of Gender Studies, 16(3): 217-232.

Murphree, Hyon Joo Yoo. (2008). Transnational cultural production and the politics of moribund masculinity. East Asia Cultures Critique, 16(3): 661-688.

Saeji, CedarBough T. (2009). Korean pop culture: The border crossing heroines of Hallyu. Presented as part of the University of California, Los Angeles’ International Institute program, “Chew on this: A series of artist, academic and choreographic presentations by world arts and cultures graduate students and faculty. Accessed 28 August 2012 from http://www.international.ucla.edu/calendar/showevent.asp?eventid=7381

Chang, Youngchi. (2009). Singles in Seoul: Korean femininity and western postfeminism in popular media. Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Crieghton, Millie. (2009). Japanese surfing the Korean wave: Drama tourism, nationalism, and gender via ethnic eroticisms. Southeast Review of Asian Studies, 31: 10-38. Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://www.uky.edu/Centers/Asia/SECAAS/Seras/2009/SERAS_2009.pdf#page=36

Davies, Gloria, M.E. Davies and Young-A Cho. (2010). Hallyu ballyhoo and Harisu: Marketing and representing the transgendered in South Korea. In Black, D., Stephen Epstein and Alison Tokita (Eds.) Complicated Currents. Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Monash University ePress. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://books.publishing.monash.edu/apps/bookworm/view/Complicated+Currents/122/xhtml/chapter9.html

Jung, Eun-Young. (2010). Playing the race and sexuality cards in the transnational pop game: Korean music videos for the U.S. market. Journal of Popular music studies, 22(2): 219-236.

Jung, Sun. (2010). Chogukjeok Pan-East Asian soft masculinity: Reading Boys Over Flowers, Coffee Prince and Shinhwa fan fiction. In Black, D., Stephen Epstein and Alison Tokita (Eds.) Complicated Currents. Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Monash University ePress. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://books.publishing.monash.edu/apps/bookworm/view/Complicated+Currents/122/xhtml/chapter8.html

Maliangkay, Roald. (2010). The effeminacy of male beauty in Korea. The Newsletter, no.55 (Autumn/Winter): 6-7. Accessed 22 November 2011 from http://iias.asia/files/iias_nl55_0607.pdf

Chan, Brenda. (2011). Of prince charming and male chauvinist pigs: Singaporean female viewers and the dream-world of Korean television dramas. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(3): 291-305.doi: 10.1177/1367877910391868

Kim, Joo Mee and Se Yeong Shin. (2011). The study on fashion, beauty, design and emotional image by external image type of Korean male idol stars. Fashion Business, 15(6):71-84. abstract here: http://www.papersearch.net/view/detail.asp?detail_key=1k901120

Kim, Yeran. (2011). Idol republic: the global emergence of girl industries and the commercialization of girl bodies. Journal of Gender Studies, 20(4): 333-345. DOI:10.1080/09589236.2011.617604

Kim, Jeongmee. (2012). My Lovely Sam-Soon: Absent sex and the unbearable lightness of sweet Korean romance. In J. Aston, B. Glynn and B. Johnson (Eds.) Television, Sex and Society: Analyzing Contemporary Representations. pp. 111 – 124. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group.

Lie, John. (2013). Why didn’t “Gangnam Style” go viral in Japan? Gender divide and subcultural heretogenity in contemporary Japan. Cross-Currents: East Asian  History and Culture Review, (9): 44-67. Accessed 16 June 2016 from https://cross-currents.berkeley.edu/e-journal/issue-9/lie 


Park, Michael K. (2015). Psy-Zing up the mainstream of “Gangnam Style”: Embracing Asian masculinity as neo-minstrelsy? Journal of Communication Inquiry, 39(3): 195-212.

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 3: CULTURE and CULTURAL INDUSTRY

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 3 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled “For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 and Part 2 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Culture

Iwabuchi, Koichi, Stephen Muecke, & Mandy Thomas. (2004). Rogue Flows: Trans-Asian Cultural Traffic. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Kim, J.H. (2004). Korean wave in Japanese culture. Journal of Human Subjectivity, 4(1): 85-95. 

Park, Jung-sun. (2004). Korean American youth and transnational flows of popular culture across the Pacific. Amerasia Journal, 30(1): 147-169.

Fu Su Yin, Kelly, and Kai Khiun Liew. (2005).  “Hallyu in Singapore: Korean Cosmopolitanism or the Consumption of Chineseness?” Korean Journal 45.4: 206-32.

Iwabuchi, Koichi. (2005). Discrepant intimacy: Popular culture flows in East Asia. In J.N. Erni and S.K. Chua (Eds.) Asian Media Studies: Politics of Subjectivities. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Jeon, G. and T. Yoon. (2005). Realizing the Korean wave into an Asiatic flow. Korean Journal of Broadcasting

Kwon, Haesoo and Chai Wonho. (2005). The diffusion of Korean Wave (Hallyu) as a cultural exchange. In 2005 Proceedings of the International Conference of Seoul Association for Public Administration (SAPA). pp. 1 -20.

Lee, Keehyeung. (2005). Assessing and Situating ‘the Korean Wave’ (Hallyu) through a Cultural Studies Lens. Asian Communication Research, 2(2): 5-22. Abstract assessed 2 November 2011. http://www.dbpia.co.kr/view/ar_view.asp?arid=1030476

Park, J.S. (2005). The Korean Wave: Transnational cultural flows in Northeast Asia. In C.K. Armstrong, G. Rozman, S.S. Kim & S. Kotkin (Eds.), Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia. London: M.E. Sharpe, Inc.

Lee, Heejae. (2005). The Korean wave on the viewpoint of Hwa-Yi (China-Barbarism). First International Conference of the Asian Philosophical Association. pp.117 – 124. Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.icapa2005.fatih.edu.tr/icapa2005.pdf#page=125

Lee, Jamie Shinhee. (2005). Discourses of fusion and crossing: Pop culture in Korea and Japan. Thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Kim, Shin Dong. (2006). Mass culture of/in Korea. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://his.hallym.ac.kr/site/user_up/file/2006_s9.doc

 Seo, Yongseok. (2006). East Asian response to the globalization of culture: perceptional change and cultural policy. In J. Dator, Dick Pratt and Yongseok Soo (Eds.) Fairness, globalization and public institutions: East Asia and beyond. X: University of Hawai’i Press. pp. 319 – X. 

Kim, Eun Mee. (2007). South Korean culture goes global?: Kpop and the Korean wave. Presented at the University of California, Los Angeles International Institute. Accessed 28 August 2012 from http://www.international.ucla.edu/calendar/showevent.asp?eventid=6106

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Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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KPK Presents at KPOPCON13!

KPK: Kpop Kollective will once again bring the knowledge at KPOPCON’13 February 16-17 at UC Berkeley!

BEYOND THE BIAS: WHAT K-POP FANS REALLY THINK AND DO

Crystal S. Anderson, Ph.D., KPK: Kpop Kollective

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S., KPK: Kpop Kollective

Bianca Flowers, KPK: Kpop Kollective

Do you troll the Internet for pictures of your bias? Watch dance versions of videos on YouTube?  Share your opinions on a forum? Go to K-pop concerts?

This interactive session will uncover the complex world of K-pop fandom and give tips on how you can be a better fan!  We’ll talk about the different kinds of fans and ways they interact with and support each other and their favorite K-pop artists and groups. We will also share how you can enhance your own fan experience by learning how to protect your original fan production (like fan art and fancam video), organize and properly attribute your stash of pictures collected from around the web, and properly share images and video.

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography Part 1: BOOKS

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Earlier this year I introduced KPK readers to the work I’m doing to collate and annotate as much scholarly information about Hallyu as I can. Without further ado, I share with you the first section, focusing on books covering Hallyu. Subsequent parts of this series will be identified by SUBJECT rather than format. Please note that these entries are listed by year, starting with 1991 (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

Continue reading “For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography Part 1: BOOKS”