CONFERENCE: Undergraduate Research and Digital Humanities @ CUR 2016 Biennial

Beyond the Classroom: Undergraduate Research and Digital Humanities

CUR 2016 Biennial Conference | Tampa, FL | June 23-28, 2016

Students may be “digital natives,” but how can we channel their informal interaction with digital environments into a rich research experience? This presentation shares digital tools that students can use for Internet research and explores the challenges of working on co-curricular collaborative digital humanities projects with undergraduates.

Undergraduate research is often constructed within a curricular context, focusing on the face-to-face experience between an instructor and student as crucial to mentoring and the transmission of inquiry and research skills. This presentation shares the experience of a collaborative digital humanities project conducted through the Internet. Because of its digital nature, the project invited students globally to participate as research assistants. Students were trained, received feedback on their work and participated in a research community almost entirely in a digital environment. As a result, new models of engaging students online emerged from the project. The project introduced students to an array of digital tools and trained them in skills that they could use in their curricular lives beyond the project. At the same time, the project encountered several challenges involved with motivating an undergraduate population outside of a course working on an unfunded project. The presentation will explore how the digital presents new opportunities for undergraduate research, especially in areas where faculty mentorship exists outside of the institution.

Presentation: Beyond the Classroom: Undergraduate Research and Digital Humanities

 

Kpop Kollective: Saving Kpop, One Profile at a Time

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KPK: Kpop Kollective is the oldest and only aca-fansite for modern Korean popular music (K-pop). Established in 2010, it has developed into a community of practice  and a thematic research collection centered on K-pop.  Kpop Kollective promotes the public’s understanding of contemporary Korean popular culture, creates resources and provides analysis and context on K-pop from a global perspective.

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 6: INTERNET & SOCIAL MEDIA

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 6 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Nakamura, Lisa. (2003). “Where do you want to go today?” Cybernetic tourism, the internet and transnationality. In G. Dines and J. M. Humez Gender, Race and Class in Media. (pp.684-687).Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong. (2006). Living in Cyworld: Contextualising Cy-Ties in South Korea. In Bruns, Axel & Jacobs, Joanne (Eds.) Uses of Blogs. (pp. 173-186). New York: Peter Lang.

Ramesh, Bharadwaj. (2006). A Hallyu Story: Behind the origins and success of the Korean wave in China & the future of content in a broadband world. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://bit.ly/23ggIuk   

Farrer, James. (2007). Asian youth culture in a globalizing world: Networked and not inhibited. Global Asia, 2(1): 102-110. Accessed 17 June 2016 from https://www.globalasia.org/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/129.pdf

Kang, Seungmook & Hadong Kim. (2009). Korean traditional space creator for digital contents. The International Journal of Virtual Reality, 8(3): 33-37. Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.ijvr.org/issues/issue3-2009/6.pdf

Kim, Kyung Hee, Yun Haejin & Youngmin Yoon. (2009). The internet as a facilitator of cultural hybridization and interpersonal relationship management for Asian international students in South Korea. Asian Journal of Communication, 19(2): 152-169. Retrieved 16 June 2016 from http://bit.ly/1rstmZd

Cha, Hyunhee & Seongmook Kim. (2011). A case study on Korean wave: Focused on K-pop concert by Korean idol groups in Paris, June 2011. In T. Kim et. Al (Eds.) Multimedia, Computer Graphics, and Broadcasting. (pp. 153-162). Heidelberg: Springer.

Jung, Eun Young. (2012). New Wave formations: K-pop idol bands, social media and the remaking of the Korean Wave. Presented at the Nam Center for Korean Studies’ Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media Symposium. Accessed 16 June 2016 from https://wwwprod.lsa.umich.edu/ncks/eventsprograms/conferencessymposia/hallyu20eunyoungjung_ci   

Jung, Sun. (2012). K-pop, Indonesian fandom, and social media. Transformative Works and Cultures,8. Accessed 16 June 2016 from http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/289  

Lee, Moonhaeng. (2012). Star management of talent agencies and social media in Korea. In M. Friedrichsen and W. Muhl-Benninghaus (Eds.) Handbook of Social Media Management. (pp.549-564) New York: Springer.

Oh, Ingyu & Gil-Sung Park. (2012). From B2C to B2B: Selling Korean pop music in the age of social media. Korea Observer, 43(3): 365-397.

Ahn, JoongHo, Sehwan Oh & Hyunjung Kim. (2013). Korean pop takes off! Social media strategy of Korean entertainment industry. 10th International Conference on Service Systems and Service Management. IEEE. Pp. 774-777. Doi 10.1109/ICSSSM.2013.6602528

Oh, Chong-jin & Young-gil Chae. (2013). Constructing culturally proximate spaces through social network services: The case of Hallyu (Korean Wave) in Turkey. International Relations / Uluslararasi Iliskiler, 10(38): 77-99.

Oh, Ingyu and Hyo Jung Lee. (2013). Mass media technologies and popular music genres. K-pop and YouTube. Korea Journal, 53(4): 34-58. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://www.iwahs.org/research/data/3)%20Mass%20Media%20Technologies%20and%20Popular%20Music%20Genres%20K-pop%20and%20YouTube,%20Ingyu%20OH%20and.pdf

Jin, Dal Yong & Kyong Yoon. (2014). The social mediascape of transnational Korean pop culture: Hallyu 2.0 as spreadable media practice. New Media & Society. Doi: 10.1177/1461444814554895.

Kim, Minjeong, Yun-Cheol Heo, Seong-Cheol Choi & Han Woo Park. (2014). Comparative trends in global communication networks of #Kpop tweets. Quantity & Quality, 48(5): 2687-2702. Doi 10.1007/s11135-013-9918-1.

Kim, Yong Hwan, Dahee Lee, Nam Gi Hong & Min Song. (2014). Exploring characteristics of video consuming behavior in different social media using K-pop videos. Journal of Information Science, 40(6): 806-822.

Kim, Yonghwan, Dahee Lee, Jung Eun Hahm, Namgi Han & Min Song. (2014). Investigating socio-cultural behavior of users reflected in different social channels on K-pop. Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on World Wide Web. (pp. 325-326). Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2577324  Doi 10.1145/2567948.2577324

Seong, Cheol Choi, Xanat Vargas Meza & Han Woo Park. (2014). South Korean culture goes Latin America: Social network analysis of Kpop tweets in Mexico. International Journal of Contents, 10(1): 36-42.

Sung, Jun. (2014). Youth, social media and transnational cultural distribution: The case of online K-pop circulation. In A. Bennett and B. Robards (Eds.) Mediated Youth Cultures. (pp. 114-129). New York: Springer.

Hebrona, Matthew Niel. (2015). Ermagerd! Oppa so hot: Examining K-pop through Internet memes. Master’s thesis. The Graduate School of the Catholic University of Korea. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/25809417/Ermahgerd_Oppa_so_Hot_Examining_K-Pop_through_Internet_Memes

Song, Min, Yoo Kyung Jeong & Ha Jin Kim. (2015). Identifying the topology of the K-pop video community on YouTube: A combined co-comment analysis approach. Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, 66(12): 2580-2595.

Xu, Weiai Wayne, Ji Young Park & Han Woo Park. (2015). The networked cultural diffusion of Korean wave. Online Information Review, 39(1): 43-60.

Baek, Young Min. (2016). Relationship between cultural distance and cross-cultural music video consumption on YouTube. Social Science Computer Review, 33(6): 730-748.

King, Elizabeth. (2016). Kpop Twitter: group identity in a globalized space. Master’s Thesis, Ball State University. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/200254

Yecies, Brian, Jie Yang, Aegyung Kim, Kai Soh & Matthew Berryman. (2016). The Douban online social media barometer and the Chinese reception of Korean popular media flows. Participants: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies, 13(1): 114-138. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://www.participations.org/Volume%2013/Issue%201/6.pdf

Yoon, Kyong & Dal Yong Jin. (2016). The Korean wave phenomenon in Asian diasporas in Canada. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 37(1): 69-83.

Song, Min. (n.d.) Detecting topology of K-pop stars on YouTube with bigdata analytics. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://informatics.yonsei.ac.kr/tsmm/download/Presentation_Youtube_Kpop_131210.pdf

Happy Reading!

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2016 KPK Global Recruitment

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Are you a motivated, committed, detail-oriented person who can work independently? Want to use your love of Korean popular music for something important? Then it’s your lucky day! The 2016 KPK Global Recruitment is open!

Fostering a fun and engaging environment, KPK is the oldest aca-fansite and only community of scholars who work together to curate information about modern Korean popular music (K-pop) and offers the opportunity for student research assistants to learn how to do the same.

As research assistants, students create discographies and videographies for mini-profiles on K-pop artists using Google Slides and YouTube playlists. Using these digital tools, they develop information literacy skills, particularly the ability to locate and verify information. As members of a community of practice, they also receive valuable e-mentorship from experienced scholars and get to participate in scholarly discussions about K-pop in a supportive environment.

Applicants must have some knowledge of K-pop and should be able to write well in English. All positions are voluntary (non-paid).   All successful applicants undergo a one-month training and probationary period. Subsequent appointments are three months and may be renewed.

Interested? Complete the  2016 Application:

http://goo.gl/forms/PhHGPXI7prmsQ2hl2.

Upon receipt, we will contact you with a sample assignment to complete and return. Members of KPK senior staff will review your completed assignment and make a decision within one week (seven days).

KPK now recruits once a year, so this will be your ONLY opportunity to submit an application this year. 2016 RECRUITMENT ENDS JULY 15, 2016.

Want to know more about KPK? Click to find out more about KPK’s mission and its members.

Questions about the application process? Email Crystal S. Anderson, Director, KPK: Kpop Kollective (csaphd5@gmail.com).

 

UPDATE! 2016 KPK GLOBAL RECRUITMENT IS NOW CLOSED!! SEE YOU NEXT YEAR!

Fault Lines in Transcultural Fandom

Stock photo from Pixabay
                                                                           Stock photo from Pixabay

A recent clash of opinions over the status of Kangin, a member of the Korean pop group Super Junior, exposes fault lines that can occur with transcultural fandoms.

SM Entertainment issued a statement about Kangin’s recent DUI accident.  Not satisfied with the common period of self-reflection that typically follows a scandal,  a group of Korean fans created a petition to have Kangin leave the group entirely. Citing Kangin’s previous drunk driving incident and other controversies, the fans argue that Kangin’s continued presence will damage the group’s reputation:   “We see this series of acts not benefiting Super Junior’s image and career at all. Instead we view them as actions that only cause damage. From our position as fans who support Super Junior, we cannot help but discuss this issue that will influence their image greatly” (soompi).    However, comments on soompi’s Facebook post for the story reveals criticism of those who support Kangin’s departure. This is typical of several posts:  “Not true fans of Super Junior, if they want Kangin to leave the group.”

Such opinions reveal fault lines in the fandom that fall along lines of national identity. The original petition was brought by members of the Korean community site DC Inside, which cannot be accessed by those outside of Korea. While all who support Kangin’s departure are not Korean, the non-fan and anti-fan characterization of those who do certainly applies to the Korean fans who created the petition. Such statements overlook the contextualization of these fans. Operating within Korean culture, they reveal the danger they see to the reputation to the group, which plays differently inside of Korea than it does outside of Korea.  Subtly, fans who criticize the Korean petitioners ignore the Korean context and unwittingly impose their own cultural expectations.

Bertha Chin and Lori Hitchcock Morimoto argue that transcultural fandom offers “the possibility that a fannish orientation may (at times) supersede national, regional and/or geographical boundaries” (99). This certainly describes times when the transcultural fandom is in agreement. However, controversies often reveal how national perspectives inform how fans interact with one another over a controversy. Fandoms contend with notions of authenticity generally, creating hierarchies to determine who is a “real” fan. However, a scandal seems to make these existing fault lines even more pronounced.

With no in-depth knowledge of the petitioners, some fans question their identity as real fans. This is particularly odd given the history of the E.L.Fs, or Everlasting Friends, the Super Junior fandom. These fans reportedly have a history of taking action surrounding the membership of the group. Reportedly, they protested at SM Entertainment when it appeared the agency planned to add additional members to the group. Others have suggested that E.L.F’s pooled their money to buy SM Entertainment stock to become stockholders and have a say in such decisions. Documentation of such events are difficult to locate, but such stories point to the tendency for this particular fandom to be deeply concerned about the membership of the group. Moreover, given that this is a Korean pop group, it is intriguing that fans largely outside of Korea would question the fan identity of the petitioners.

Sources:

Adrian. “Some Fans ‘Abandon’ Kangin; Ask Him to Leave Super Junior.” hellokpop. 26 May 2016.

Chin, Bertha and Lori Hitchcock Morimoto. “Towards a Theory of Transcultural Fandom.” Participations: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies. 10.1 (2013): 92-108.

Soompi. “Do you think 슈퍼주니어(Super Junior)‘s Kangin should leave the group?” Facebook. 26 May 2016.

kokoberry. “SM Entertainment Releases Official Statement About Kangin’s DUI Accident.” soompi. 24 May 2016.

kokoberry. “Super Junior Fans Petition for Kangin to Leave Group.” soompi. 25 May 2016.

 

 

It’s a K-pop Thing(Link)….

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

You’ve finally convinced a friend/co-worker/parent/spouse/transit-seat partner/random stranger that your favorite group is worth taking a closer look at, and *gasp* they’ve asked a K-pop Fan Gateway Question (while feigning nonchalance): “which one is [member]”?

As a K-pop fan, you already know this game: such a question is already an indication that the questioner would like to know more…way more. But you don’t want to overwhelm them with information – rather, just give them a comprehensive overview of the group or member. You know…to “satisfy” (read: further ignite) their “casual” curiosity. To prepare for this moment – and help emerging K-pop fans everywhere – what can you do? Where can you send them?

Try ThingLink.

ThingLinklogo
Make K-pop artist overviews featuring websites, videos, and more using ThingLink.

ThingLink is a web and mobile application that allows its users to create interactive images and videos for use in social media, on websites, and more. Users can augment photos with links to websites, videos, audio, and more.   After images/videos are posted to ThingLink, community users can search for images and “Touch” (like) other interactive images and videos, too.

If you make ThingLinks for several groups from different entertainment companies, consider organizing them by Channels – a feature in ThingLink. You can also decide what you want everyone to see by choosing if your TLs will be public or private. One drawback: if you want browsing users to locate your work, you’ll need to make a title that has the search term(s) you think people will use since ThingLink doesn’t really make use of traditional hashtags as a finding aid.

ThingLink is free and also offers expanded options for different fees. It is available on Google Play and the App Store!

Here’s a ThingLink I made for …well, you know…(drag your mouse over the image to interact with it):

Enjoy!

P.S. Taemin is on second left. You know, in case you were wondering…casually.:-)

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