For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 11: WINTER SONATA

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 11 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4,  Part 5 , Part 6, Part 7 , Part 8, Part 9, and Part 10 of the bibliography.

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The promotional poster for the Korean television drama, “Winter Sonata.” Photo credit: KBS.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Kaori, H. (2005).  Assessing the popularity of Winter Sonata. How do women’s emotions affect the public sphere in Japan. Media Consumption and the Korean Wave in East Asia

Lee, Sue Kyung. (2005). The Korean wave in Japan: Winter sonata and its implications through audience perceptions. Thesis, University of Texas, Austin.

Kim, D. (2006). Transcending Borders: Korean Soap Opera, Winter Sonata, Effects on Japanese Middle-Aged Women. Paper presented to the 56th annual convention of the International Communication Association, Dresden, Germany, June.

Han, Min Hwa et al. (2007). Forced invisibility to negotiating visibility: Winter Sonata, the Hanyru phenomenon and Zainichi Koreans in Japan. Keio Communication Review. 29: 155-174. Accessed from http://www.mediacom.keio.ac.jp/publication/pdf2007/pdf/Min%20Wha%20HAN.pdf

Hanaki, T., A. Singhal, M. Han, D.-K. Kim and K. Chitnis. (2007) Hanryu, the Korean Wave, Sweeps East Asia: Winter Sonata, a South Korean Television Series, Grips Japan,  The International Communication Gazette 69(3): 281–94. Accessed from http://utminers.utep.edu/asinghal/Reports/Hanaki_Singhal_Han_Kim_Chitnis_Gazette_2007.pdf

Han, Benjamin Min. (2008). Reliving Winter Sonata: memory, nostalgia and identity. Post Script, 27(3). Accessed from http://www.freepatentsonline.com/article/Post-Script/191765321.html

Han, Hee Joo & Jae-Sub Lee. (2008). A Study on the KBS drama Winter Sonata and its impact on Korea’s Hallyu tourism development. Journal of Travel & Tourism Marketing, 24 (2/3): 115-126. 

Kim, Samuel Seongseop, Jerome Agrusa and Kaye Chon. (2008). The effects of Korean pop culture on Hong Kong residents’ perceptions of Korea as a potential tourist destination. Journal of Travel & Tourism, 24(2/3):  163-183.

Mori, Yoshitaka. (2008). Winter Sonata and cultural practices of active fans in Japan: Considering middle-aged women as cultural agents. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 127-X. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press. 

Kim, Do Hyun et al. (2009). Television drama, narrative engagement and audience buying behavior: The Effects of Winter Sonata in Japan.The International Communication Gazette, 71(7): 1-17. Accessed from http://utminers.utep.edu/asinghal/Articles%20and%20Chapters/Kim-Singhal-et-al-2009-Winter-Sonata-0purchasing-behavior-Gazette-1.pdf

Lee, Jonghoon. (2010). Winter sonata dreams: The influence of the Korean wave on Japanese society. Thesis, Florida State University. 

Tokita, Alison. (2010). Winter Sonata and the politics of memory. In Black, D., Stephen Epstein and Alison Tokita (Eds.) Complicated Currents. Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Monash University ePress. Accessed from http://books.publishing.monash.edu/apps/bookworm/view/Complicated+Currents/122/xhtml/chapter3.html

Happy Reading!

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 9: IMAGE

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 9 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4,  Part 5 , Part 6, Part 7 , and Part 8 of the bibliography.

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Photo credit: N-Y-C, Pixabay.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Chung, Heejoon. (2003). Sport star vs. Rock star in globalizing popular culture: Similarities, differences and paradoxes in discussion of celebrities. International review for the Sociology of Sport, 38(1): 99-108.

Park. G. (2004). An analysis of the effects of Hanlyu reflected in street fashion in China. Korean Journal of Human Ecology, 13(6): 967-983.

Rhee, Seung Chul. (2006). The average Korean attractive face. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 30(6): 729-730. doi: 10.1007/s00266-006-0157-x

Tsai, Eva. (2007). Caught in the terrains: an inter-referential inquiry of trans-border stardom and fandom. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 8(1): 135-154. ALSO PRINTED in:  Tsai, Eva. 2007. Caught in the terrains: an inter-referential inquiry of trans-border stardom and fandom. In K-H Chen and C.B. Huat (Eds.) The Inter-Asia Cultural Studies Reader. pp.323-344. Abingdon: Routledge.

Rhee, Seung Chul, Eun Sang Dhong and Eul Sik Yoon. (2009). Photogrammatic facial analysis of attractive Korean entertainers. Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, 33(2): 167-174.

Lee Soojin. (2010). Celebrity fandom and its relationship to tourism and leisure behaviors: the case of the Korean wave. Thesis, Texas A&M University.

Kim, Joo Mee and Se Yeong Shin. (2011). The study on fashion, beauty, design and emotional image by external image type of Korean male idol stars. Fashion Business, 15(6):71-84. 

Kim, Yeran. (2011). Idol republic: the global emergence of girl industries and the commercialization of girl bodies. Journal of Gender Studies, 20(4): 333-345.  

Park, Judy. (2011). The aesthetic style of Korean singers in Japan: A review of Hallyu from the perspective of fashion. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 2(19): 23- 34. Accessed 7 April 2020 from http://www.ijbssnet.com/journals/Vol_2_No_19_Special_Issue_October_2011/3.pdf

Maliangkay, Roald. (2012). The token non-conformist: The packaging of Korean boy and girl bands. Presented at the Nam Center for Korean Studies’ Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media Symposium. Accessed 7 April 2020 from https://www.ii.umich.edu/ncks/news-events/events/conferences—symposia/hallyu-2-0–the-korean-wave-in-the-age-of-social-media/hallyu-program/hallyu-2-0–roald-maliangkay.html 

Sung, Sang-Yeon Loise. (2012). The role of Hallyu in the construction of East Asian regional identity in Vienna. European Journal of East Asian Studies. 11(1): 155-171.

Jamass, Maria M. (2014). Images and perceptions of Muslims and Arabs in Korean popular culture and society. Thesis, Florida International University. Accessed 7 April 2020 from https://digitalcommons.fiu.edu/etd/1204/

Howard, Keith. (2015). Politics, parodies, and the paradox of Psy’s ‘Gangnam Style.’ Romanian Journal of Sociological Studies, (1): 14-29. Accessed 7 April 2020 from http://journalofsociology.ro/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/Full-text-pdf.1.pdf

Unger. Michael A. (2015). The aphoria of presentation: Deconstructing the genre of K-pop girl group music videos in South Korea. Journal of Popular Music Studies, 27(1): 25-47.

Kim, Suk Young. (2016). The many faces of K-pop music videos: Revues, Motown, and Broadway in ‘Twinkle.’ Journal of Popular Culture, 49(1): 136-154.

Rocha, Nayelli Lopez. (2016). The role of Hallyu as pop culture in the creation and dissemination of the contemporary Korean woman’s image. Portes: Revista Mexicana de estudios sobre la Cuenca del Pacifico, 9(18): 171-195. Accessed 16 June 2016 from http://revistasacademicas.ucol.mx/index.php/portes/article/view/412

Happy Reading!

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 8: KOREAN DRAMA VIEWERSHIP and HABITS

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 8 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4,  Part 5 , Part 6, and Part 7 of the bibliography.

glenn-carstens-peters-EOQhsfFBhRk-unsplash
Photo credit: Glenn Carstens-Peters, Pixabay.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Lee Minu and Chong Heup Cho. (1990/2003). Women watching together: An ethnographic study of Korean soap opera fans in the United States. In Gail Dines and Jean M. Humez (eds.) Gender, race  and class in media. Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications. 

Kim, Youna. (2002). Women, television and everyday life: Korean women’s reflexive experience of television mediated by generation and class. Thesis, University of London.

Park, Jung-sun. (2004). Korean American Youths’ Consumption of Korean and Japanese TV Dramas and Its Implications. In Koichi Iwabuchi (Ed.) Feeling Asian Modernities: Transnational Consumption of Japanese TV Dramas.  Pp. 275-300. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Park, Sora. (2004). China’s Consumption of Korean Television Dramas: An Empirical Test of the “Cultural Discount” Concept’, Korea Journal 44: 265–90.

Han, Kyung-Koo. (2006). From housewives to butterflies: Hallyu and the fantastic journey to Korea. Korea Journal, 46(2): 269-274.

Kwon, Dong Hwan. (2006). Is it too early to talk about “Hallyu” in the Phillipines? Koreanovela and its reception among Filipino audience. Cultural Space and Public Sphere in Asia

Shim D. (2006). Korean women television viewers in Singapore. Cultural Space and Public Sphere in Asia. 

Kim, Dae Do and Su Na Mi. (2007). Consuming Korean TV Dramas in China: Analysis of a new cultural flow, “Hanryu”, in the Asian context. pp. 233-261.  

Lin, Angel and Avin Tong.  (2007). Crossing boundaries: male consumption of Korean TV dramas and negotiation of gender relations in modern day Hong Kong. Journal of Gender Studies, 16(3): 217-232.

Shim, D. (2007). Korean wave and Korean women television viewers in Singapore. Asian Journal of Women’s Studies, 13(2): 63-82.

Hirata, Yukie. (2008). Touring ‘Dramatic Korea’: Japanese women as viewers of Hanryu dramas and tourists on Hanyru tours. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 143 – 156.. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press. (see also, Tourism)

La Torre, Nichole S. (2008). Hallyu: Discourses of Korean drama viewership in China. Thesis. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://scholarspace.manoa.hawaii.edu/bitstream/handle/10125/20412/M.A.CB5.H3_3489_r.pdf?sequence=2

Kim, Do Hyun et al. (2009). Television drama, narrative engagement and audience buying behavior: The Effects of Winter Sonata in Japan.The International Communication Gazette, 71(7): 1-17. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://utminers.utep.edu/asinghal/Articles%20and%20Chapters/Kim-Singhal-et-al-2009-Winter-Sonata-0purchasing-behavior-Gazette-1.pdf 

Lee, Soobum and Hyejung Ju. (2010). Korean television dramas in Japan: Imagining “East Asianness” and consuming “nostalgia.” Asian Women, 26(2): 77-105. 

Chan, Brenda. (2011). Of prince charming and male chauvinist pigs: Singaporean female viewers and the dream-world of Korean television dramas. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(3): 291-305.doi: 10.1177/1367877910391868

Hung Jen Su, Yu-An Huang, Glen Brodowsky & Hyun Jeong Kim. (2011.) The impact of product placement on TV-induced tourism: Korean TV dramas and Taiwanese viewers. Tourism Management, 32(4): 805-814.

Hien, Phan Thi Thu. (2012). Feminitive attraction of Hallyu (Korean Wave) in Southeast Asia. University of Social Sciences. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://en.hcmussh.edu.vn/3cms/?cmd=130&art=1344907879368&cat=1329473737740

Lee, Sangjoon. (2012). From diaspora to Drama Fever: Consuming Korean dramas in North America. Presented at the Nam Center for Korean Studies’ Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media Symposium. (Watch video of this presentation)

Chuang, Lisa M. & Hye Eun Lee. (2013). Korean wave: enjoyment factors of Korean dramas in the U.S. International Journal of Intercultural Relations, 37(5): 594-604.

Kuotsu, Neikolie. (2013). Architectures of pirate film cultures: encounters with the Korean wave in “Northeast” India. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 14(4): 579-599.

Yoo, Jae-woong, Samsup Jo, and Jaemin Jung. (2014). The effects of television viewing, cultural proximity, and ethnocentrism on country image. Social Behavior & Personality: an international journal, 42(1):89 – 96. 

Ade Muana Husniati, Maryam. (2016). Adolescents, Korean dramas, and local wisdom. Proceeding of the 3rd Conference on Communication, Culture, and Media Studies. Accessed 7 April 2020 from https://journal.uii.ac.id/CCCMS/article/view/7144/6346

Ruslan, Norbaiduri & Latif, Siti Sakinah Abdul. (2016). Malay women readings of Korean drama. Journal of Education and Social Sciences, 4(June): 343-365.

Hartzell, Kathryn Grace. (2019). Melodramatic and formulaic: The global appeal of Korean television dramas. Thesis, Georgetown University. Accessed 7 April 2020 from https://repository.library.georgetown.edu/handle/10822/1054912

Vinco, Alessandra & Mazur, Daniela. (n.d.). Fans, hallyu, and broadcast TV: The case of the K-drama “Happy Ending” pioneering in Brazil. Accessed 7 April 2020 from https://congress.aks.ac.kr:52525/korean/files/2_1478846583.pdf

Happy Reading!

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Not the Only One: Multi-Fandoms and K-pop

 

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD

Associate Professor of English, Longwood University

Can’t decide which K-pop group or artist is your favorite? You are not alone! Global fans of K-pop tend to support several groups and artists at the same time, while their Korean counterparts tend to support only one group or artist. But why? And which groups tend to be in a global fan’s multi-fandom? This study seeks to answer these questions in survey that uses open-ended and multiple-choice questions. Take the survey and tell your friends!

Link: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/kpopmultifandom

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 7: IDENTITY & NATIONALISM

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 7 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4,  Part 5  and Part 6 of the bibliography.

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The flag of the Republic of Korea. Photo credit: Lisy, Pixabay.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Lee,  D.  Y.  (2004,  March).  A  typology  of  East  Asian  popular  culture  and  Korea’s nationalism.  The  paper  presented  in  the Asian  Culture  Symposium.  Seoul:  Korea. 

Lee, Hee-Eun. (2005). Othering ourselves: identity and globalization in Korean popular music, 1992-2002. Thesis, University of Iowa.

James, David E., Marsha Kinder, Stanley Rosen, Eunsun Cho. (2006). Transnational modernity, national identity, and South Korea melodrama (1945-1960s). Thesis, University of Southern California. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://digitallibrary.usc.edu/assetserver/controller/item/etd-Cho-20061114.pdf 

HyeJung, J. (2007). The nature of nationalism in the “Korean Wave”: A framing analysis of news coverage about Korean pop culture. Presented at the 93rd National Communication Association Conference. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p_mla_apa_research_citation/1/8/7/9/2/pages187925/p187925-1.php

Siriyuvasak, Ubonrat & Hyunjoon Shin. (2007). Asianizing Kpop: production, consumption and identification patterns among Thai youth. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 8(1): 109-136 

Cayla, Julien and Giana M. Eckhardt. (2008). Asian brands and the shaping of a transnational imagined community. Journal of Consumer Research, 35 (2): 216 – 230. Accessed 7 December 2016 from http://www.juliencayla.com/JCR%20final.pdf

Sung, Sang Yeon. (2008). Globalization and the regional flow of popular music: the role of the Korean wave (Hanliu) in the construction of Taiwanese identities and Asian values. Thesis, Indiana University, Bloomington. 

Yang, Fang-chih Irene. (2008). Rap(p)ing Korean Wave: National identity in question. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 191- X. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press.

Blitz, Brian. (2009). Blood, birth, imagination: ethnic nationalism and South Korean popular culture. Thesis, Bowling Green State University. Accessed 7 December 2016 from https://etd.ohiolink.edu/rws_etd/document/get/bgsu1245256858/inline

Cho, Young Chul. (2009). Security, nationalism and popular culture: Screening South Korea’s uneasy identity in the early 2000s. East Asia, 26(3): 227-246.

Crieghton, Millie. (2009). Japanese surfing the Korean wave: Drama tourism, nationalism, and gender via ethnic eroticisms. Southeast Review of Asian Studies, 31: 10-38. Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://www.uky.edu/Centers/Asia/SECAAS/Seras/2009/SERAS_2009.pdf#page=36 

Shin, Hyunjoon. (2009). Reconsidering Transnational Cultural Flows of Popular Music in East Asia: Transbordering Musicians in Japan and Korea Searching for “Asia.” Korean Studies, 33(1): 101-123. 

Kim, Pil Ho and Hyunjoon Shim. (2010). The birth of “Rok”: Cultural imperialism, nationalism and the glocalization of rock music in South Korea, 1964-1975. East Asia Cultures Critique,18(1): 199-230. 

Cho, Younghan. (2011). Desperately seeking East Asia amidst the popularity of South Korean pop culture in Asia. Cultural Studies, 25(3): 383-404. doi: 10.1080/09502386.2010.545424 

Joo, Jeongsuk. (2011). Transnationalism of Korean popular culture and the rise of “pop nationalism” in Korea. The Journal of Popular Culture, 44(3): 489-504. 

Kim, Gwangseok. (2011). Practicing nationalism: culture, technology and national identity in contemporary Korea. Thesis, University of Texas at Austin. Accessed 22 November 2011 from http://repositories.lib.utexas.edu/bitstream/handle/2152/ETD-UT-2011-08-4267/KIM-THESIS.pdf?sequence=1

Kim, Youna. (2011). Diasporic nationalism and the media. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(2): 133-151.

Sutton, R. Anderson. (2011). “Fusion” and questions of Korean cultural identity in music. Korean Studies, 35: 4-24. 

Sung, Sang-Yeon Loise. (2012). The role of Hallyu in the construction of East Asian regional identity in Vienna. European Journal of East Asian Studies, 11(1): 155-171.

Ho, Swee-Lin. (2012). Fuel for South Korea’s “Global Dreams Factory”: The desires of parents whose children dream of becoming K-pop stars. Korea Observer, 43(3): 471-502.

Yoo, Jae-woong, Samsup Jo, and Jaemin Jung. (2014). The effects of television viewing, cultural proximity, and ethnocentrism on country image. Social Behavior & Personality: an international journal, 42(1):89 – 96. 

Han, Gil-soo. (2015). K-pop nationalism: Celebrities and acting blackface in the Korean media. Journal of Media & Cultural Studies, 29(1): 2-16.

Kim, Bongchul & Vasileva, Kristina. (2017). Popular culture as an important element in creating a national image of Korea. Advanced Science Letters, 23(10): 9866-9869.

Happy Reading!

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Mini Data Note: Why Fans Like B.A.P!

B.A.P
B.A.P

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD
Associate Professor of English, Longwood University

Survey results suggest that BABYs, fans of the male K-pop group B. A.P, like the group because of its uniqueness, music and the extramusical activities of the members. These results come from the FAVORITE ARTIST: KARTIST3YR DATASET, part of the 3Year Korean Popular Music Survey. This data note is based on a small sample of 11 respondents.

Uniqueness

Respondents point to the way that B.A.P differs from other K-pop “idol” groups.  One noted that “they have a different feeling to the Kpop industry” and another stated that “they don’t just have a pretty-boy sound.” This can be seen from their debut song, “Warrior.”

 

Music

Respondents also referred to the group’s musical ability. One stated, “They have a wide variety of types of songs (‘Coffee Shop’ is mellow, ‘Hurricane’ is dance and ‘Badman’ is just hard).” Another stated, “They clearly have a passion for music and the music they make, even sometimes getting involved with its creation.”

Extramusical Activities

Several respondents noted the activities of the members beyond music making. One respondent noted, “They’re having a concert because of their charity works. They have the heart of helping others despite . . . their busy schedules.” Another stated, “The leader participates in helping children and the fans also participate in actions [by] UNICEF.”

Image: 1

Sources

“FAVORITE ARTIST: KARTIST3YR DATASET,” KPOPCULTURE, accessed December 1, 2016, http://kpop.omeka.net/items/show/695.

TSENT 2008. “B.A.P – WARRIOR (워리어) M/V.” YouTube. 25 Jan 2012. https://youtu.be/5tLooPlf2Sw, *(9 Dec 2016).

Mini Data Note: Why Fans Like Infinite!

Infinite
Infinite

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD

Associate Professor of English, Longwood University

Survey results suggests that Inspirits, fans of the male K-pop group Infinite, like the group because of its strong choreography, vocals and group dynamic.  These results come from the FAVORITE ARTIST: KARTIST3YR DATASET, part of the Hallyu Korean Popular Music Survey. This data note is based on a small sample of 13 respondents.

Choreography

Respondents repeatedly point to Infinite’s dance skills as a primary reason for the group’s appeal, noting their ability to dance in sync. One respondent stated that s/he liked the group because “they have one of the most dopest choreography ever; they are /nearly/synchronized.” Such dance skills can be seen in music videos like “Come Back Again.”

 

Vocals

Other respondents point to the group’s vocal talent. One respondent noted that “all of the members can sing, even the rappers.” Another noted the ability of the members to harmonize. This can be seen in their performance of “Diamond.”

Group Dynamic

Some respondents noted the dynamic between group members. One respondent described the members as “handsome and funny,” while another noted that “they’re serious on stage but down-to-earth off and funny/goofy.”

Sources

“FAVORITE ARTIST: KARTIST3YR DATASET,” KPOPCULTURE, accessed December 1, 2016, http://kpop.omeka.net/items/show/695.

Jeff Benjamin. “INFINITE’s ‘Destiny’ Music Video: Watch the EDM-Influenced Single’s Blockbuster Visual.” Billboard. 16 Jul 2013. http://www.billboard.com/articles/columns/k-town/1764404/infinites-destiny-music-video-watch-the-edm-influenced-singles. (1 Dec 2016).

KBS World TV. “INFINITE – Back / Diamond [Music Bank COMEBACK / 2014.07.18].” YouTube. 12 Aug 2014. https://youtu.be/scg2UqfC15U, (1 Dec 2016).

wolliment. “인피니트 ‘다시돌아와’ 안무ver. 뮤직비디오.” YouTube. 27 Jun 2010. https://youtu.be/6NzVJYEcruw, (1 Dec 2016).

 

 

Last Fans Standing: A Multiple Case Study of Longtime and Adult K-pop Fans

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Crystal S. Anderson, PhD

Associate Professor of English, Longwood University

This survey has been revised! Click here for new survey!!!

Most people assume that the only audience for modern Korean popular music (K-pop) is teenagers. As a result, they also assume that K-pop music lacks longevity.  However, the presence of longtime fans suggests that K-pop remains appealing to some fans for years. The existence of adult fans challenges the notion that K-pop only appeals to teenagers.  This multiple case study seeks to understand why individuals remain K-pop fans for years and why adults find K-pop appealing. For three years, I will be asking questions about these atypical fans of K-pop. This survey contains several open-ended and multiple-choice questions that ask how fans see themselves and ask about their K-pop music preferences and fan activity. Please take the survey!

 

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 6: INTERNET & SOCIAL MEDIA

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 6 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5 of the bibliography.

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Photo credit: geralt, Pixabay.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Nakamura, Lisa. (2003). “Where do you want to go today?” Cybernetic tourism, the internet and transnationality. In G. Dines and J. M. Humez Gender, Race and Class in Media. (pp.684-687).Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong. (2006). Living in Cyworld: Contextualising Cy-Ties in South Korea. In Bruns, Axel & Jacobs, Joanne (Eds.) Uses of Blogs. (pp. 173-186). New York: Peter Lang.

Ramesh, Bharadwaj. (2006). A Hallyu Story: Behind the origins and success of the Korean wave in China & the future of content in a broadband world. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://bit.ly/23ggIuk   

Farrer, James. (2007). Asian youth culture in a globalizing world: Networked and not inhibited. Global Asia, 2(1): 102-110. Accessed 17 June 2016 from https://www.globalasia.org/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/129.pdf

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CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (Panel Session): The Collective on 2/19/2015

Doing DH Library-Style

The Collective

Knoxville, TN • February 19-20, 2015

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S. • University of South Carolina Lancaster

This panel session reviews the meaning of Digital Humanities within the Library and Information Science framework, explores how the discipline is being applied in library settings, and demonstrates how DH projects support and serve library users and other stakeholders. Kendrick’s portion of the session will delve into pedagogical applications (information literacy support), research and instruction collaborations with other teaching faculty members, and other opportunities for leadership using DH tools and applications. More here.