Tag: hallyu

It’s a K-pop Thing(Link)….

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

You’ve finally convinced a friend/co-worker/parent/spouse/transit-seat partner/random stranger that your favorite group is worth taking a closer look at, and *gasp* they’ve asked a K-pop Fan Gateway Question (while feigning nonchalance): “which one is [member]”?

As a K-pop fan, you already know this game: such a question is already an indication that the questioner would like to know more…way more. But you don’t want to overwhelm them with information – rather, just give them a comprehensive overview of the group or member. You know…to “satisfy” (read: further ignite) their “casual” curiosity. To prepare for this moment – and help emerging K-pop fans everywhere – what can you do? Where can you send them?

Try ThingLink.

ThingLinklogo
Make K-pop artist overviews featuring websites, videos, and more using ThingLink.

ThingLink is a web and mobile application that allows its users to create interactive images and videos for use in social media, on websites, and more. Users can augment photos with links to websites, videos, audio, and more.   After images/videos are posted to ThingLink, community users can search for images and “Touch” (like) other interactive images and videos, too.

If you make ThingLinks for several groups from different entertainment companies, consider organizing them by Channels – a feature in ThingLink. You can also decide what you want everyone to see by choosing if your TLs will be public or private. One drawback: if you want browsing users to locate your work, you’ll need to make a title that has the search term(s) you think people will use since ThingLink doesn’t really make use of traditional hashtags as a finding aid.

ThingLink is free and also offers expanded options for different fees. It is available on Google Play and the App Store!

Here’s a ThingLink I made for …well, you know…(drag your mouse over the image to interact with it):

Enjoy!

P.S. Taemin is on second left. You know, in case you were wondering…casually.:-)

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 5: GENDER and SEXUALITY

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 5 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3  and Part 4 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

GENDER and SEXUALITY

Cho, Eun Sun. (2005). The stray bullet and the crisis of Korean masculinity. In N. Abelmann and K. McHugh (Eds.), South Korean Golden Age Melodrama. pp.99-116. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

Hilts, Janet Flora. (2006). Seo Taiji 1992-2004: South Korean popular music and masculinity. Thesis, York University.

Jung, Sun. (2006). Bae Yong-Joon, hybrid masculinity & the counter-coeval desire of Japanese female fans. Particip@tions 3(2). Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.participations.org/volume%203/issue%202%20-%20special/3_02_jung.htm

Lin, Angel and Avin Tong. (2007). Crossing boundaries: male consumption of Korean TV dramas and negotiation of gender relations in modern day Hong Kong. Journal of Gender Studies, 16(3): 217-232.

Murphree, Hyon Joo Yoo. (2008). Transnational cultural production and the politics of moribund masculinity. East Asia Cultures Critique, 16(3): 661-688.

Saeji, CedarBough T. (2009). Korean pop culture: The border crossing heroines of Hallyu. Presented as part of the University of California, Los Angeles’ International Institute program, “Chew on this: A series of artist, academic and choreographic presentations by world arts and cultures graduate students and faculty. Accessed 28 August 2012 from http://www.international.ucla.edu/calendar/showevent.asp?eventid=7381

Chang, Youngchi. (2009). Singles in Seoul: Korean femininity and western postfeminism in popular media. Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Crieghton, Millie. (2009). Japanese surfing the Korean wave: Drama tourism, nationalism, and gender via ethnic eroticisms. Southeast Review of Asian Studies, 31: 10-38. Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://www.uky.edu/Centers/Asia/SECAAS/Seras/2009/SERAS_2009.pdf#page=36

Davies, Gloria, M.E. Davies and Young-A Cho. (2010). Hallyu ballyhoo and Harisu: Marketing and representing the transgendered in South Korea. In Black, D., Stephen Epstein and Alison Tokita (Eds.) Complicated Currents. Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Monash University ePress. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://books.publishing.monash.edu/apps/bookworm/view/Complicated+Currents/122/xhtml/chapter9.html

Jung, Eun-Young. (2010). Playing the race and sexuality cards in the transnational pop game: Korean music videos for the U.S. market. Journal of Popular music studies, 22(2): 219-236.

Jung, Sun. (2010). Chogukjeok Pan-East Asian soft masculinity: Reading Boys Over Flowers, Coffee Prince and Shinhwa fan fiction. In Black, D., Stephen Epstein and Alison Tokita (Eds.) Complicated Currents. Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Monash University ePress. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://books.publishing.monash.edu/apps/bookworm/view/Complicated+Currents/122/xhtml/chapter8.html

Maliangkay, Roald. (2010). The effeminacy of male beauty in Korea. The Newsletter, no.55 (Autumn/Winter): 6-7. Accessed 22 November 2011 from http://iias.asia/files/iias_nl55_0607.pdf

Chan, Brenda. (2011). Of prince charming and male chauvinist pigs: Singaporean female viewers and the dream-world of Korean television dramas. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(3): 291-305.doi: 10.1177/1367877910391868

Kim, Joo Mee and Se Yeong Shin. (2011). The study on fashion, beauty, design and emotional image by external image type of Korean male idol stars. Fashion Business, 15(6):71-84. abstract here: http://www.papersearch.net/view/detail.asp?detail_key=1k901120

Kim, Yeran. (2011). Idol republic: the global emergence of girl industries and the commercialization of girl bodies. Journal of Gender Studies, 20(4): 333-345. DOI:10.1080/09589236.2011.617604

Kim, Jeongmee. (2012). My Lovely Sam-Soon: Absent sex and the unbearable lightness of sweet Korean romance. In J. Aston, B. Glynn and B. Johnson (Eds.) Television, Sex and Society: Analyzing Contemporary Representations. pp. 111 – 124. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group.

Lie, John. (2013). Why didn’t “Gangnam Style” go viral in Japan? Gender divide and subcultural heretogenity in contemporary Japan. Cross-Currents: East Asian  History and Culture Review, (9): 44-67. Accessed 16 June 2016 from https://cross-currents.berkeley.edu/e-journal/issue-9/lie 


Park, Michael K. (2015). Psy-Zing up the mainstream of “Gangnam Style”: Embracing Asian masculinity as neo-minstrelsy? Journal of Communication Inquiry, 39(3): 195-212.

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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Why Is This Taking So Long?: Behind the Scenes of K-pop Fan Research

survey
Source: Psychology Today

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD

Elon University

Anybody can ask some questions about your favorite K-pop group but scholarship involves a lot more.  Enter the glamorous(?) world of K-pop fan research!

What is research?

That’s a good question. Most K-pop fans have taken polls asking for their opinion, but these are usually for market research or for fun. Academic research is different.  The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services defines research as “a systematic investigation, including research development, testing and evaluation, designed to develop or contribute to generalizable knowledge.” There is a method to the madness, so the first thing that research involves is knowing the method.  Some people work with quantitative methods (i.e. statistics), but I use qualitative methods (examining  text in the form of responses and interviews) to explain what K-pop fans think about K-pop.  In either case, you need to know what you are doing, and while a degree isn’t required, it helps.  But long before the questions go up, you need a healthy dose of curiosity.

The Bright Idea

lightbulb
Source: Light bulb

Some people look at K-pop and think nothing of it. However, I, as a researcher, wonder:  Why do fans like K-pop? How do they support their groups? What do they get out of being a fan?  As K-pop becomes more popular, news media and online commentators talk more and more about it.  They find the whole phenomenon strange and make assumptions.  For example, outlets like CNN talk about the groups and fans that support them as if they are all the same.

As a K-pop fan, though, I know those observations do not match what I see among K-pop fans.  From my experience,  I know that the groups are different. SHINee and Shinhwa may both be male groups, but they are different. I know the fandoms are different.  Shawols are not like Shinhwa Changjos.

In addition, these outlets never talk about fan culture. I know that fans of SS501 know why Park Jung Min and Kim Hyung Joon are called Tom and Jerry.   Shinhwa fans know who Mama Bird and Baby Bird are in the group. SHinee fans know what Onew Sangtae is.  K-pop fandoms are wonderfully complicated so I wanted to explore how the fandoms are different and how they interact with one another, since they are a central part of the global spread of fandom.

But first, I needed to find out what had already been written on K-pop fans.

What Others Say

peopletalking
Source: People Talking

Research differs from opinion polls in that part of its purpose is to contribute to new knowledge. There is no need to do a research project if it’s already been done.  You don’t want to look like a boob saying something that’s already been said.  I found that there were a few studies on K-pop fans, but they focused on K-pop fans in East Asian countries, and they didn’t address the unique nature of individual fandoms (see Sung Jung, Korean Masculinities and Transcultural Consumption: Yonsama, Rain, Oldboy, K-pop Idols).  For example, Shu-han Chiou did research for a master’s thesis which identified fans as “devotee, insider, intermediate of devotee-insider, and low-consumption-and-self-centered.” No K-pop fan talks about themselves that way.  You are a A+ (fan of MBLAQ) or a SONE (fan of SNSD).  People also form online fan communities that support multiple groups, like DongBangBLAQ (fans of TVXQ and MBLAQ), f(snsd) (fans of f(x) and SNSD), TripleKISS (fans of SS501 and UKISS) and SuperGeneration (fans of Super Junior and SNSD).

Once I got the lay of the scholarly land, it was time to develop the study!

Just Do It!

The iFans project was born! I developed a series of surveys where fans could talk about their perspectives about being a fan and promoted them on the KPK site as well as social media such as Twitter and Facebook.

 Source:  http://www.clker.com/cliparts/6/b/1/2/1194989167583201900aiga_waiting_room1.svg.med.png
Source: Waiting

Then, I waited. In order to study the data, you have to collect the data and you need to collect enough data to form valid conclusions.   You wait for people to share the survey with their friends (hint, hint).  In this way, part of the research is beyond your control.

You also may have to tweak your survey instrument.   Sometimes a link doesn’t work. Sometimes you see you can get information in a more effective way, like providing text boxes for answers rather than having respondents list answers in just one big text box.

At some point, you get enough data to work with. Analyzing the data is the most unglamorous part of research, but it’s also the most exciting.  It means reading each and every response and finding patterns in what people say. For example, the iFans general Case Studies survey had over 300 respondents, but generated hundreds of statements to analyze.

By systematically analyzing the data, I get to see what K-pop fans think about themselves, other fandoms and the artists themselves.  I can now say things based on evidence about K-pop fans.  As a result of my research I know, for example, that no matter the fandom, fans are fans of groups because of the music.  I know that fans of SS501 like the group because of the brotherhood they show, and that fans of SNSD like the group because they are cute and dorky.

So, this is why it takes so long! If you’ve taken one of the longer surveys, you’re probably wondering where your answers are. Some of them make up the infographics you’ve been seeing on the site. Other responses are in the research reports. Still others will be the basis of articles and chapters for academic journals and books. In all cases, analyzing and writing up the reports takes time because of the large amount of response involved.

So, I’ve created the SMS: Saturday Mini Survey. This two-question survey is based on current events in K-pop so that fans can get research on K-pop a little bit faster. Be on the lookout for it!

In the end, real research follows a plan and follows rules to provide a better understanding of K-pop and its global fans.

Sources

“Code of Federal Regulations.” U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. http://www.hhs.gov/ohrp/humansubjects/guidance/45cfr46.html

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CONFERENCE ABSTRACT: Hallyu America! The Global Flow of K-pop @ Binghamton University

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Manse in the USA!: What K-pop Means in the United States

April 12, 2013 ♦ Binghamton University

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD ♦ Elon University

Despite its status as a subculture, Korean popular music of the Hallyu era (K-pop) has a significant cultural impact in the United States. Combining elements of Korean and other cultures, it appeals to fans of varying ages and ethnicities. Using surveys and analysis of online K-pop culture originating in the United States, this paper will show that hybridization explains the appeal of and the backlash against K-pop. K-pop appeals to American fans because it is simultaneously similar to and different from American popular culture. American fans recognize elements of American culture and they embrace Korean cultural elements. At the same time, critiques of K-pop in the United States target those very elements, mocking K-pop and its fans for the ways they diverge from mainstream American cultural norms. For many in the United States, K-pop represents a complex negotiation with a Korean global culture.

CONFERENCE ABSTRACT: 2013 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)

Hybrid Hallyu: The American Soul Tradition In K-pop

2013 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)

Washington, DC • March 27-30, 2012

Crystal S. Anderson, Ph.D. • Elon University

Hallyu (Korean wave), a Korean cultural movement directed towards global audiences, represents hybrid and transnational sensibilities.  Ever since the debut of Seo Taiji and the Boys in 1992, Korean popular music (K-pop) has been influenced by American soul and R&B.  This paper examines the soul tradition in contemporary K-pop by interrogating the adoption and adaptation of the genre by several K-pop groups.

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography Part 1: BOOKS

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Earlier this year I introduced KPK readers to the work I’m doing to collate and annotate as much scholarly information about Hallyu as I can. Without further ado, I share with you the first section, focusing on books covering Hallyu. Subsequent parts of this series will be identified by SUBJECT rather than format. Please note that these entries are listed by year, starting with 1991 (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

(more…)