How to Make It in America: K-Pop’s Bid for the West – VICE (blog)

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How to Make It in America: K-Pop’s Bid for the West
VICE (blog)
G-Dragon falls into a folding chair, looking calm and nearly bored.

Kpop Kollective‘s insight:

Overall, this is a very thorough account of G-Dragon’s presence at KCON, althought he was not the only K-pop artist there.  However, Tyler reinforces the idea that K-pop is for teenagers. Many K-pop artists are veterans even at young ages and many K-pop fans are not teenagers. One runs into problems when trying to explain K-pop’s appeal to older fans if one insists that it’s a genre solely for young fans. 

See on noisey.vice.com

YG Entertainment, COSON Team Up in China – BusinessKorea

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YG Entertainment, COSON Team Up in China
BusinessKorea
COSON and YG Entertainment will establish a cosmetics marketing corporation in Hong Kong with US$10 million capital.

Kpop Kollective‘s insight:

Korean agencies like YG Entertainment use their artists to branch out beyond music into other economic ventures.

See on www.businesskorea.co.kr

Are Korean Male Idols the Cure to Asian American Emasculation? [BLOG] – Asian Fortune

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Asian Fortune
Are Korean Male Idols the Cure to Asian American Emasculation?

Kpop Kollective‘s insight:

This article continues a scholarly trend of limiting discussions of masculinity in K-pop to the bishonen ideal. Doing so ignores the range of masculinites represented by K-pop artists and groups. If one looks at a series of concepts for any established male K-pop grouup, one will find that concepts change, and groups use images associated with a variety of masculinities. Aozora’s results may also be impacted by her small sample size. Opinions of K-pop fans are greatly influenced by other factors, including how long they have been fans and their prior experiences with other fandoms and other modes of Asian popular culture.

See on www.asianfortunenews.com

K-Pop’s Antic Emissary Raids the Cupboard

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“Coup D’Etat,” the new album from the K-Pop star G-Dragon, has America heavily on its mind and in its credits.

Kpop Kollective‘s insight:

This overview of G-Dragon focuses on the surface: what he looks like, the kinds of images in which he appears. Is Caramanica suggesting that surface is all G-Dragon has to offer? Fans of G-Dragon find him creative and give him credit for those images, concepts and forays into song-writing, but G-Dragon’s participation in his own creation is largely absent from this article.

See on www.nytimes.com

A Swede Makes K-Pop Waves

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Mark Russell’s article draws attention to the global impact of people behind the scenes of K-pop, like songwriters.  At the same time, the story overlooks the role of Korean producers and songwriters on K-pop, especially those who bring their experience with American R&B and soul.

See on blogs.wsj.com

A Primer on K-Drama Feminism

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This article explores the crossroads of Kdrama and Feminism. What I find interesting is that it does not define feminism, acknowledge the different brands of feminism and recognize the imposition of the Western concept of feminism on Korean cultural production.

See on www.hyphenmagazine.com

Catching the Korean wave | BusinessWorld Online Edition

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Another take on global Hallyu, this time from the Philippines, which has a large Hallyu following.  Significantly, Hallyu needs to be studied within the cultural context of the respective countries. This article shows that Philippine popular culture provides a unique cultural context for Hallyu culturla production, like Kdramas. Rina Jimenez-David notes that emotion plays a large part in the appeal of Kdramas.  This article also explores the possibility of using the South Korean model of supporting culture.

See on www.bworldonline.com

Hitting Pause on ‘Gangnam Style’

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Helen Lee gives a slightly new interpretation of Gangnam Style by comparing it to a minstrel show.  Lee identifies herself as Korean American, and writes, “I imagine my ambivalence about the video’s popularity might be akin to what I’ve heard some of my African American friends say about certain black rappers or shows on BET — that they are unintentionally propagating old stereotypes in the manner of a modern-day minstrel show.”

 

This is significant because it shows that different people are reading the Gannam Style phenomenon differently, bringing a different set of cultural lenses to it. There are a vareity of responses to the video, and in order to understand the video, especially in an American context, we have to weigh them. 

See on www.urbanfaith.com

K-pop fever grabs scholars’ attention

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This story from The Korea Herald shows the international intellectual interest in Hallyu.  In addition to  scholars from Korea presenting on Hallyu, the story references an academic from Mexico who explores the role of fan clubs in Mexico. 

 

Hallyu studies is truly global, not just confined to the East Asian region. It also involves a variety of aspects because it is a cultural movement that includes not just music but also other culturla production.

See on view.koreaherald.com