Young Turks Club: A Boy’s Legacy

Young Turks Club, KPOPIANA, http://kpoparchives.omeka.net/items/show/1526.
Young Turks Club, KPOPIANA, http://kpoparchives.omeka.net/items/show/1526.

Young Turks Club (YTC) is the brainchild of former Seo Taiji and the Boys’ member Lee Juno, who began his own entertainment company after his group’s disbandment in 1996. Young Turks Club members included Lim Sung Eun, Song Jin Ah,Han Hyun Nam, Ji Joon Goo, and Choi Seung Min. . . .

To see the enhanced profile, including discographies and videographies, click the image to go to KPOPIANA, KPK’s multimedia database on Korean popular music of the Hallyu era!

CFP: K-POP AND K-DRAMA FANDOMS

CFP: K-POP AND K-DRAMA FANDOMS

Special issue of Journal of Fandom Studies

Guest Editors: Crystal S. Anderson and Doobo Shim

This special issue responds to the well-established and global subculture of fans of Korean popular music (K-pop) and Korean television drama (K-drama). K-pop and K-drama are the products of Hallyu, a cultural movement from Korea directed towards the global stage that originated in the late 1990s.  Recent global successes of Korean artists such as Psy, Girls Generation, 2NE1 and BigBang as well as K-drama actors such as Lee Min Ho and Jang Geun Suk represent only a portion of the vibrant and diverse fandom.  This special issue seeks to examine the uniqueness of K-pop and K-drama fandoms and their contribution to global fandom scholarship.

Continue reading “CFP: K-POP AND K-DRAMA FANDOMS”

CONFERENCE ABSTRACT: Hallyu America! The Global Flow of K-pop @ Binghamton University

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Manse in the USA!: What K-pop Means in the United States

April 12, 2013 ♦ Binghamton University

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD ♦ Elon University

Despite its status as a subculture, Korean popular music of the Hallyu era (K-pop) has a significant cultural impact in the United States. Combining elements of Korean and other cultures, it appeals to fans of varying ages and ethnicities. Using surveys and analysis of online K-pop culture originating in the United States, this paper will show that hybridization explains the appeal of and the backlash against K-pop. K-pop appeals to American fans because it is simultaneously similar to and different from American popular culture. American fans recognize elements of American culture and they embrace Korean cultural elements. At the same time, critiques of K-pop in the United States target those very elements, mocking K-pop and its fans for the ways they diverge from mainstream American cultural norms. For many in the United States, K-pop represents a complex negotiation with a Korean global culture.

Using Screencasting for Research and Teaching

While the world has been familiar with online video for a while now, “screencasting” is a relatively new term in our technological vocabulary. Screencasting is similar to a screenshot, but instead of having static images, it’s a video of what is happening on your computer screen. This can be a powerful tool to teach people using visuals and audio. At least that’s how Dr. Crystal Anderson, a professor in the English department, uses it.

Read more at Elon University – Instructional and Campus Technologies!

 

CONFERENCE ABSTRACT: 2013 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)

Hybrid Hallyu: The American Soul Tradition In K-pop

2013 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)

Washington, DC • March 27-30, 2012

Crystal S. Anderson, Ph.D. • Elon University

Hallyu (Korean wave), a Korean cultural movement directed towards global audiences, represents hybrid and transnational sensibilities.  Ever since the debut of Seo Taiji and the Boys in 1992, Korean popular music (K-pop) has been influenced by American soul and R&B.  This paper examines the soul tradition in contemporary K-pop by interrogating the adoption and adaptation of the genre by several K-pop groups.

Continue reading “CONFERENCE ABSTRACT: 2013 Popular Culture Association/American Culture Association (PCA/ACA)”

KPK Presents at KPOPCON13!

KPK: Kpop Kollective will once again bring the knowledge at KPOPCON’13 February 16-17 at UC Berkeley!

BEYOND THE BIAS: WHAT K-POP FANS REALLY THINK AND DO

Crystal S. Anderson, Ph.D., KPK: Kpop Kollective

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S., KPK: Kpop Kollective

Bianca Flowers, KPK: Kpop Kollective

Do you troll the Internet for pictures of your bias? Watch dance versions of videos on YouTube?  Share your opinions on a forum? Go to K-pop concerts?

This interactive session will uncover the complex world of K-pop fandom and give tips on how you can be a better fan!  We’ll talk about the different kinds of fans and ways they interact with and support each other and their favorite K-pop artists and groups. We will also share how you can enhance your own fan experience by learning how to protect your original fan production (like fan art and fancam video), organize and properly attribute your stash of pictures collected from around the web, and properly share images and video.

2012 in review

The WordPress.com stats helper monkeys prepared a 2012 annual report for this blog.

Here’s an excerpt:

About 55,000 tourists visit Liechtenstein every year. This blog was viewed about 290,000 times in 2012. If it were Liechtenstein, it would take about 5 years for that many people to see it. Your blog had more visits than a small country in Europe!

Click here to see the complete report.

Crystal Anderson Writes for the Popular Romance Project

Crystal Anderson writes on romance gone awry in “Where Is The Love?” for the Popular Romance Project:

“Korean television dramas (K-dramas) rarely present a straightforward romance. They are often driven by convoluted courtships where likeable couples spend the series overcoming obstacles in order to eventually embark on an uplifting relationship. . . . Not every K-drama is so morally tidy, however. Consider the 2010 K-drama Baker King Kim Tak Goo, which features a couple whose romance is based on dysfunction rather than love.”

Read more at the Popular Romance Project!

KPK 2.0: The Next Generation of K-pop Profiles

As you know, KPK is dedicated to collecting information about Hallyu-era K-pop. To that end, we are in the process of creating enhanced profiles of Kpop artists and groups, with even more information!

KPOPIANA is a collaborative digital humanities project that aims to collect and organize information about Korean popular music of the Hallyu era (1992-present).  It is built on the Omeka platform, which” is web-publishing platform that allows anyone with an account to create or collaborate on a website to display collections and build digital exhibitions.”  This allows us to present information in a more interactive kind of way.

Members of KPK are in the process of migrating profiles from WordPress to Omeka, as well as creating new profiles in Omeka.  Check out some of your favorite profiles:

2NE1: Music for Anyone

2PM: They’re Your Men

B2UTY and the BEAST

Boyfriend: Can They Be Yours?

CN BLUE: Code Name BLUE

Epik High: Epic Music

f(x): The Perfect Formula

SHINee: It’s Another World

SS501: Five Men United As One

AND, one new profile:

Fin.K.L

Don’t worry! You will always be able to find links for old and new profiles here on the KPK blog, or you can navigate straight to KPOPIANA as we migrate more profiles, so you never have to worry about where to find your K-pop info!  We’ll be rolling out new enhanced profiles over the next few months, so stay tuned!