Author: Kaetrena Davis Kendrick

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 6: INTERNET & SOCIAL MEDIA

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 6 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Nakamura, Lisa. (2003). “Where do you want to go today?” Cybernetic tourism, the internet and transnationality. In G. Dines and J. M. Humez Gender, Race and Class in Media. (pp.684-687).Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong. (2006). Living in Cyworld: Contextualising Cy-Ties in South Korea. In Bruns, Axel & Jacobs, Joanne (Eds.) Uses of Blogs. (pp. 173-186). New York: Peter Lang.

Ramesh, Bharadwaj. (2006). A Hallyu Story: Behind the origins and success of the Korean wave in China & the future of content in a broadband world. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://bit.ly/23ggIuk   

Farrer, James. (2007). Asian youth culture in a globalizing world: Networked and not inhibited. Global Asia, 2(1): 102-110. Accessed 17 June 2016 from https://www.globalasia.org/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/129.pdf

Kang, Seungmook & Hadong Kim. (2009). Korean traditional space creator for digital contents. The International Journal of Virtual Reality, 8(3): 33-37. Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.ijvr.org/issues/issue3-2009/6.pdf

Kim, Kyung Hee, Yun Haejin & Youngmin Yoon. (2009). The internet as a facilitator of cultural hybridization and interpersonal relationship management for Asian international students in South Korea. Asian Journal of Communication, 19(2): 152-169. Retrieved 16 June 2016 from http://bit.ly/1rstmZd

Cha, Hyunhee & Seongmook Kim. (2011). A case study on Korean wave: Focused on K-pop concert by Korean idol groups in Paris, June 2011. In T. Kim et. Al (Eds.) Multimedia, Computer Graphics, and Broadcasting. (pp. 153-162). Heidelberg: Springer.

Jung, Eun Young. (2012). New Wave formations: K-pop idol bands, social media and the remaking of the Korean Wave. Presented at the Nam Center for Korean Studies’ Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media Symposium. Accessed 16 June 2016 from https://wwwprod.lsa.umich.edu/ncks/eventsprograms/conferencessymposia/hallyu20eunyoungjung_ci   

Jung, Sun. (2012). K-pop, Indonesian fandom, and social media. Transformative Works and Cultures,8. Accessed 16 June 2016 from http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/289  

Lee, Moonhaeng. (2012). Star management of talent agencies and social media in Korea. In M. Friedrichsen and W. Muhl-Benninghaus (Eds.) Handbook of Social Media Management. (pp.549-564) New York: Springer.

Oh, Ingyu & Gil-Sung Park. (2012). From B2C to B2B: Selling Korean pop music in the age of social media. Korea Observer, 43(3): 365-397.

Ahn, JoongHo, Sehwan Oh & Hyunjung Kim. (2013). Korean pop takes off! Social media strategy of Korean entertainment industry. 10th International Conference on Service Systems and Service Management. IEEE. Pp. 774-777. Doi 10.1109/ICSSSM.2013.6602528

Oh, Chong-jin & Young-gil Chae. (2013). Constructing culturally proximate spaces through social network services: The case of Hallyu (Korean Wave) in Turkey. International Relations / Uluslararasi Iliskiler, 10(38): 77-99.

Oh, Ingyu and Hyo Jung Lee. (2013). Mass media technologies and popular music genres. K-pop and YouTube. Korea Journal, 53(4): 34-58. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://www.iwahs.org/research/data/3)%20Mass%20Media%20Technologies%20and%20Popular%20Music%20Genres%20K-pop%20and%20YouTube,%20Ingyu%20OH%20and.pdf

Jin, Dal Yong & Kyong Yoon. (2014). The social mediascape of transnational Korean pop culture: Hallyu 2.0 as spreadable media practice. New Media & Society. Doi: 10.1177/1461444814554895.

Kim, Minjeong, Yun-Cheol Heo, Seong-Cheol Choi & Han Woo Park. (2014). Comparative trends in global communication networks of #Kpop tweets. Quantity & Quality, 48(5): 2687-2702. Doi 10.1007/s11135-013-9918-1.

Kim, Yong Hwan, Dahee Lee, Nam Gi Hong & Min Song. (2014). Exploring characteristics of video consuming behavior in different social media using K-pop videos. Journal of Information Science, 40(6): 806-822.

Kim, Yonghwan, Dahee Lee, Jung Eun Hahm, Namgi Han & Min Song. (2014). Investigating socio-cultural behavior of users reflected in different social channels on K-pop. Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on World Wide Web. (pp. 325-326). Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2577324  Doi 10.1145/2567948.2577324

Seong, Cheol Choi, Xanat Vargas Meza & Han Woo Park. (2014). South Korean culture goes Latin America: Social network analysis of Kpop tweets in Mexico. International Journal of Contents, 10(1): 36-42.

Sung, Jun. (2014). Youth, social media and transnational cultural distribution: The case of online K-pop circulation. In A. Bennett and B. Robards (Eds.) Mediated Youth Cultures. (pp. 114-129). New York: Springer.

Hebrona, Matthew Niel. (2015). Ermagerd! Oppa so hot: Examining K-pop through Internet memes. Master’s thesis. The Graduate School of the Catholic University of Korea. Retrieved from https://www.academia.edu/25809417/Ermahgerd_Oppa_so_Hot_Examining_K-Pop_through_Internet_Memes

Song, Min, Yoo Kyung Jeong & Ha Jin Kim. (2015). Identifying the topology of the K-pop video community on YouTube: A combined co-comment analysis approach. Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, 66(12): 2580-2595.

Xu, Weiai Wayne, Ji Young Park & Han Woo Park. (2015). The networked cultural diffusion of Korean wave. Online Information Review, 39(1): 43-60.

Baek, Young Min. (2016). Relationship between cultural distance and cross-cultural music video consumption on YouTube. Social Science Computer Review, 33(6): 730-748.

King, Elizabeth. (2016). Kpop Twitter: group identity in a globalized space. Master’s Thesis, Ball State University. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/200254

Yecies, Brian, Jie Yang, Aegyung Kim, Kai Soh & Matthew Berryman. (2016). The Douban online social media barometer and the Chinese reception of Korean popular media flows. Participants: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies, 13(1): 114-138. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://www.participations.org/Volume%2013/Issue%201/6.pdf

Yoon, Kyong & Dal Yong Jin. (2016). The Korean wave phenomenon in Asian diasporas in Canada. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 37(1): 69-83.

Song, Min. (n.d.) Detecting topology of K-pop stars on YouTube with bigdata analytics. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://informatics.yonsei.ac.kr/tsmm/download/Presentation_Youtube_Kpop_131210.pdf

Happy Reading!

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

It’s a K-pop Thing(Link)….

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

You’ve finally convinced a friend/co-worker/parent/spouse/transit-seat partner/random stranger that your favorite group is worth taking a closer look at, and *gasp* they’ve asked a K-pop Fan Gateway Question (while feigning nonchalance): “which one is [member]”?

As a K-pop fan, you already know this game: such a question is already an indication that the questioner would like to know more…way more. But you don’t want to overwhelm them with information – rather, just give them a comprehensive overview of the group or member. You know…to “satisfy” (read: further ignite) their “casual” curiosity. To prepare for this moment – and help emerging K-pop fans everywhere – what can you do? Where can you send them?

Try ThingLink.

ThingLinklogo
Make K-pop artist overviews featuring websites, videos, and more using ThingLink.

ThingLink is a web and mobile application that allows its users to create interactive images and videos for use in social media, on websites, and more. Users can augment photos with links to websites, videos, audio, and more.   After images/videos are posted to ThingLink, community users can search for images and “Touch” (like) other interactive images and videos, too.

If you make ThingLinks for several groups from different entertainment companies, consider organizing them by Channels – a feature in ThingLink. You can also decide what you want everyone to see by choosing if your TLs will be public or private. One drawback: if you want browsing users to locate your work, you’ll need to make a title that has the search term(s) you think people will use since ThingLink doesn’t really make use of traditional hashtags as a finding aid.

ThingLink is free and also offers expanded options for different fees. It is available on Google Play and the App Store!

Here’s a ThingLink I made for …well, you know…(drag your mouse over the image to interact with it):

Enjoy!

P.S. Taemin is on second left. You know, in case you were wondering…casually.:-)

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

“I don’t know what they’re saying!”: Resolved with Flitto

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

OK, so you’re a Kpop fan who:

1. “Sings along” with Kpop songs (“sing along” = mostly hums, singing all of the English words and the occasional saranghae/su itge/mumcheo obso words or phrases that stand out…

2. Follows Kpop idols on social media even though you can barely read Hangul

3. Want to know what your Kpop idols are saying when they post to social media sites…

Well, KPK has discovered THE app/website for you:

Flitto!

Try Flitto to access translations of what your favorite Kpop artists are posting or saying on popular social media sites.
Try Flitto to access translations of what your favorite Kpop artists are posting on popular social media sites.

Flitto is a global language translation social media site. Users can join (for free!), pick their native language, and then follow people who post messages. Other users who can translate will transcribe any messages. And get this: sometimes the messages are not just in print! Super Junior-M’s Henry has posted recordings of his conversations with SHINee’s Taemin and EXO’s Xiumin. Below the recordings you’ll see the transcribed conversation in English (along with the Flitto user who transcribed the exchange).

Other Kpop Idols appearing on this awesome site include:

  • G-Dragon
  • Lee Minho
  • Kim Heechul
  • SHINee’s Onew, Jonghyun, and Key
  • Jay Park
  • Tablo

Is your idol there? Check out Flitto to finally understand all those messages they left for you!

Flitto is also available on Google Play and iTunes (cost: free!)

CONFERENCE ABSTRACT (Panel Session): The Collective on 2/19/2015

Doing DH Library-Style

The Collective

Knoxville, TN • February 19-20, 2015

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S. • University of South Carolina Lancaster

This panel session reviews the meaning of Digital Humanities within the Library and Information Science framework, explores how the discipline is being applied in library settings, and demonstrates how DH projects support and serve library users and other stakeholders. Kendrick’s portion of the session will delve into pedagogical applications (information literacy support), research and instruction collaborations with other teaching faculty members, and other opportunities for leadership using DH tools and applications. More here.

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 5: GENDER and SEXUALITY

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 5 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3  and Part 4 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

GENDER and SEXUALITY

Cho, Eun Sun. (2005). The stray bullet and the crisis of Korean masculinity. In N. Abelmann and K. McHugh (Eds.), South Korean Golden Age Melodrama. pp.99-116. Detroit: Wayne State University Press.

Hilts, Janet Flora. (2006). Seo Taiji 1992-2004: South Korean popular music and masculinity. Thesis, York University.

Jung, Sun. (2006). Bae Yong-Joon, hybrid masculinity & the counter-coeval desire of Japanese female fans. Particip@tions 3(2). Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.participations.org/volume%203/issue%202%20-%20special/3_02_jung.htm

Lin, Angel and Avin Tong. (2007). Crossing boundaries: male consumption of Korean TV dramas and negotiation of gender relations in modern day Hong Kong. Journal of Gender Studies, 16(3): 217-232.

Murphree, Hyon Joo Yoo. (2008). Transnational cultural production and the politics of moribund masculinity. East Asia Cultures Critique, 16(3): 661-688.

Saeji, CedarBough T. (2009). Korean pop culture: The border crossing heroines of Hallyu. Presented as part of the University of California, Los Angeles’ International Institute program, “Chew on this: A series of artist, academic and choreographic presentations by world arts and cultures graduate students and faculty. Accessed 28 August 2012 from http://www.international.ucla.edu/calendar/showevent.asp?eventid=7381

Chang, Youngchi. (2009). Singles in Seoul: Korean femininity and western postfeminism in popular media. Thesis, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee.

Crieghton, Millie. (2009). Japanese surfing the Korean wave: Drama tourism, nationalism, and gender via ethnic eroticisms. Southeast Review of Asian Studies, 31: 10-38. Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://www.uky.edu/Centers/Asia/SECAAS/Seras/2009/SERAS_2009.pdf#page=36

Davies, Gloria, M.E. Davies and Young-A Cho. (2010). Hallyu ballyhoo and Harisu: Marketing and representing the transgendered in South Korea. In Black, D., Stephen Epstein and Alison Tokita (Eds.) Complicated Currents. Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Monash University ePress. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://books.publishing.monash.edu/apps/bookworm/view/Complicated+Currents/122/xhtml/chapter9.html

Jung, Eun-Young. (2010). Playing the race and sexuality cards in the transnational pop game: Korean music videos for the U.S. market. Journal of Popular music studies, 22(2): 219-236.

Jung, Sun. (2010). Chogukjeok Pan-East Asian soft masculinity: Reading Boys Over Flowers, Coffee Prince and Shinhwa fan fiction. In Black, D., Stephen Epstein and Alison Tokita (Eds.) Complicated Currents. Clayton, Victoria, Australia: Monash University ePress. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://books.publishing.monash.edu/apps/bookworm/view/Complicated+Currents/122/xhtml/chapter8.html

Maliangkay, Roald. (2010). The effeminacy of male beauty in Korea. The Newsletter, no.55 (Autumn/Winter): 6-7. Accessed 22 November 2011 from http://iias.asia/files/iias_nl55_0607.pdf

Chan, Brenda. (2011). Of prince charming and male chauvinist pigs: Singaporean female viewers and the dream-world of Korean television dramas. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 14(3): 291-305.doi: 10.1177/1367877910391868

Kim, Joo Mee and Se Yeong Shin. (2011). The study on fashion, beauty, design and emotional image by external image type of Korean male idol stars. Fashion Business, 15(6):71-84. abstract here: http://www.papersearch.net/view/detail.asp?detail_key=1k901120

Kim, Yeran. (2011). Idol republic: the global emergence of girl industries and the commercialization of girl bodies. Journal of Gender Studies, 20(4): 333-345. DOI:10.1080/09589236.2011.617604

Kim, Jeongmee. (2012). My Lovely Sam-Soon: Absent sex and the unbearable lightness of sweet Korean romance. In J. Aston, B. Glynn and B. Johnson (Eds.) Television, Sex and Society: Analyzing Contemporary Representations. pp. 111 – 124. New York: Continuum International Publishing Group.

Lie, John. (2013). Why didn’t “Gangnam Style” go viral in Japan? Gender divide and subcultural heretogenity in contemporary Japan. Cross-Currents: East Asian  History and Culture Review, (9): 44-67. Accessed 16 June 2016 from https://cross-currents.berkeley.edu/e-journal/issue-9/lie 


Park, Michael K. (2015). Psy-Zing up the mainstream of “Gangnam Style”: Embracing Asian masculinity as neo-minstrelsy? Journal of Communication Inquiry, 39(3): 195-212.

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 4: GLOBAL IMPACT and GLOBALIZATION

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 4 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titledFor Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, and Part 3 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Global Impact

Dator, Jim. and Yongseok Seo. (2004). Korea as the wave of a future: The emerging dream society of icons
and aesthetic experience. Journal of Futures Studies 9(1): 31–44. Accessed 27 March 2012 from http://www.jfs.tku.edu.tw/9-1/04.pdf?referer=www.clickfind.com.au

Cho, Hae Joang. (2005). Reading the “Korean Wave” as a Sign of Global Shift.  Korea Journal 45: 147–82. Accessed 27 March 2012 from http://www.ekoreajournal.net/issue/view_pop.htm?Idx=3359

Mangliankay, Roald. (2006). When the Korean wave ripples. IIAS Newsletter, 42: 15. Accessed 27 March 2014 from https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/12766/IIAS_NL42_15.pdf?sequence=1

Yang-hwan, Jeong. (2007). Comics soar as new Korean wave. Korea focus on current topics, 15(1):67-69. Accessed 27 March 2014 from http://www.koreafocus.or.kr/images/upload/pdf/101439.pdf

Shin, Hyunjoon. (2009). Have you ever seen the Rain? And who’ll stop the Rain?: the globalizing project of Korean pop (Kpop). Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 10(4): 507-523.

Park, Gil-sung. Manufacturing creativity: Production, performance, and the dissemination of K-pop. Korea Journal, 53(4): 14-33.

 Globalization

Nederveen Pieterse, Jan. (1995). Globalization as hybridization. In M. Featherstone, S. Lash and R. Robertson (Eds.) Global Modernities. pp.45 – 68. London: Sage.Cho, Uhn. 2005. Positioning the Korean wave in the nexus between globalization and localization. Korea Journal, 45(4): 143-146.

Hyun, Oh-seok. 2004. Taking advantage of the Hallyu wave. Korea Focus, 12(6): 47-49.

Lee, Hee-Eun. (2005). Othering ourselves: identity and globalization in Korean popular music, 1992-2002. Thesis, University of Iowa.(see also, Identity and Nationalism)

Kim, Youna. (2005). Experiencing globalization. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 8(4): 445-463.

Kim, Ju Young. (2007). Rethinking media flow under globalisation: rising Korean wave and Korean TV and film policy since 1980s. PhD thesis, University of Warwick. Accessed 27 March 2014 from http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/1153/1/WRAP_THESIS_Kim_2007.pdf

Seo, Yongseok. (2006). East Asian response to the globalization of culture: perceptional change and cultural policy. In J. Dator, Dick Pratt and Yongseok Soo (Eds.) Fairness, globalization and public institutions: East Asia and beyond. X: University of Hawai’i Press. pp. 319 – X. (see also, Culture)

Yang, J. (2007). Globalization, nationalism and regionalization: The case of Korean popular culture. Development and Society, 36(2): 177-199.

Sung, Sang Yeon. (2008). Globalization and the regional flow of popular music: the role of the Korean wave (Hanliu) in the construction of Taiwanese identities and Asian values. Thesis, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Le, Lan Xuan. (2009). Imaginaries of the Asian modern: text and context at the juncture of nation and region. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  

Ryoo,  W.   (2009).  Globalization,  or  the  logic  of cultural  hybridization:  The  case  of the  Korean  wave.  Asian Journal  of Communication,  19(2),  137 -15I .

Iwabuchi, Koichi. (2010). Globalization, East Asian media cultures and their politics. Asian Journal of Communication, 20(2): 197-212.

Hogarth, Hyun-key Kim. (2013). The Korean wave: An Asian reaction to Western-dominated globalization. Perspectives on Global Development & Technology, 12(1/2): 135-171.

Hong, Soonkwan. (2013). Surfing the Korean wave: A postcolonial critique of the mythologized middlebrow consumer culture in Asia. Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, 16(1): 53-75.

Oh, Ingyu. (2013). The globalization of K-pop: Korea’s place in the global music industry. Korea Observer, 44(3): 389-409.

Lee, Gyu Tag. (2014). De-nationalization and re-nationalization of culture: The globalization of K-pop. Dissertation, George Mason University.

Meza, Xanat Varga & Han Woo Park. (2015). Globalization of cultural products: A webometric analysis of Kpop in Spanish-speaking countries. Quality & Quantity, 49(4): 1345-1360.

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

Crown J: Restoring His Reign

Crown J (Kei Hoon Kim), KPOPOANA, http://kpoparchives.omeka.net/items/show/1047

Crown J (Jewel), born Kim Kei Hoon (Kevin) is a Korean rapper who is consistently grounded in the tradition and aesthetic of American rap and hip-hop. After releasing his first album in South Korea, Crown gained recognition when he appeared on the popular Korean television reality show We Got Married with Seo In Young. They were so popular that their pairing was nicknamed the “Ant Couple.”

To see the enhanced profile, including discographies and videographies, click the image to go to KPOPIANA, KPK’s multimedia database on Korean popular music of the Hallyu era!