Tag: super junior

Fault Lines in Transcultural Fandom

Stock photo from Pixabay
                                                                           Stock photo from Pixabay

A recent clash of opinions over the status of Kangin, a member of the Korean pop group Super Junior, exposes fault lines that can occur with transcultural fandoms.

SM Entertainment issued a statement about Kangin’s recent DUI accident.  Not satisfied with the common period of self-reflection that typically follows a scandal,  a group of Korean fans created a petition to have Kangin leave the group entirely. Citing Kangin’s previous drunk driving incident and other controversies, the fans argue that Kangin’s continued presence will damage the group’s reputation:   “We see this series of acts not benefiting Super Junior’s image and career at all. Instead we view them as actions that only cause damage. From our position as fans who support Super Junior, we cannot help but discuss this issue that will influence their image greatly” (soompi).    However, comments on soompi’s Facebook post for the story reveals criticism of those who support Kangin’s departure. This is typical of several posts:  “Not true fans of Super Junior, if they want Kangin to leave the group.”

Such opinions reveal fault lines in the fandom that fall along lines of national identity. The original petition was brought by members of the Korean community site DC Inside, which cannot be accessed by those outside of Korea. While all who support Kangin’s departure are not Korean, the non-fan and anti-fan characterization of those who do certainly applies to the Korean fans who created the petition. Such statements overlook the contextualization of these fans. Operating within Korean culture, they reveal the danger they see to the reputation to the group, which plays differently inside of Korea than it does outside of Korea.  Subtly, fans who criticize the Korean petitioners ignore the Korean context and unwittingly impose their own cultural expectations.

Bertha Chin and Lori Hitchcock Morimoto argue that transcultural fandom offers “the possibility that a fannish orientation may (at times) supersede national, regional and/or geographical boundaries” (99). This certainly describes times when the transcultural fandom is in agreement. However, controversies often reveal how national perspectives inform how fans interact with one another over a controversy. Fandoms contend with notions of authenticity generally, creating hierarchies to determine who is a “real” fan. However, a scandal seems to make these existing fault lines even more pronounced.

With no in-depth knowledge of the petitioners, some fans question their identity as real fans. This is particularly odd given the history of the E.L.Fs, or Everlasting Friends, the Super Junior fandom. These fans reportedly have a history of taking action surrounding the membership of the group. Reportedly, they protested at SM Entertainment when it appeared the agency planned to add additional members to the group. Others have suggested that E.L.F’s pooled their money to buy SM Entertainment stock to become stockholders and have a say in such decisions. Documentation of such events are difficult to locate, but such stories point to the tendency for this particular fandom to be deeply concerned about the membership of the group. Moreover, given that this is a Korean pop group, it is intriguing that fans largely outside of Korea would question the fan identity of the petitioners.

Sources:

Adrian. “Some Fans ‘Abandon’ Kangin; Ask Him to Leave Super Junior.” hellokpop. 26 May 2016.

Chin, Bertha and Lori Hitchcock Morimoto. “Towards a Theory of Transcultural Fandom.” Participations: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies. 10.1 (2013): 92-108.

Soompi. “Do you think 슈퍼주니어(Super Junior)‘s Kangin should leave the group?” Facebook. 26 May 2016.

kokoberry. “SM Entertainment Releases Official Statement About Kangin’s DUI Accident.” soompi. 24 May 2016.

kokoberry. “Super Junior Fans Petition for Kangin to Leave Group.” soompi. 25 May 2016.

 

 

Like Vs. Love: Research Reveals Degrees of Attachment Among K-pop Fans

K-pop is well-known for the introduction of new groups, even while established groups continue to thrive. But are fans fickle in their K-pop choices? Do they abandon older groups for newer groups? Research suggests that while K-pop fans readily accept new groups, they have a deeper connection with veteran groups. These conclusions are based on data collected online through the Hallyu Korean Music Survey, part of a five-year study on international K-pop fans by Crystal S. Anderson.

The survey asks respondents to check all of the K-pop groups they like from a pre-determined list. This list emerged from earlier research that revealed a group of K-pop artists that global fans consistently identified as their favorites.  Out of 5099 responses from 282 respondents, the following groups represent the top 10:

  1. BigBang
  2. 2NE1
  3. SHINee
  4. Super Junior
  5. f(x)
  6. BEAST/B2ST
  7. MBLAQ
  8. B.A.P
  9. SNSD/Girls’ Generation
  10. TVXQ/DBSK

Respondents were then asked to name any group they liked not found in the predetermined list.  Out of 1229 responses from 237 respondents, the top 10 responses were:

  1. EXO
  2. Block B
  3. BTOB
  4. B1A4
  5. VIXX
  6. NU’EST
  7. Teen Top
  8. BTS
  9. SISTAR
  10. Secret

Respondents were then asked to list their three favorite K-pop groups. Out of 788 responses from 268 respondents, the top 10 responses were:

  1. BigBang
  2. SHINee
  3. EXO
  4. Super Junior
  5. Infinite
  6. 2NE1
  7. SNSD/Girls’ Generation
  8. JYJ
  9. MBLAQ
  10. TVXQ

This data suggests that K-pop fans are receptive to newer K-pop male groups. Nearly all of the groups not included in the predetermined list are groups that debuted after 2010. Female groups continue to lag behind, probably due to the fact that most K-pop groups that debut are male. However, established K-pop groups dominate when fans are asked to identify their favorite K-pop groups.  This list mirrors the predetermined list, which suggests that the longer the group has been active, more connected fans feel to the group.  Infinite has become a group that fans consistently say they like, replacing a group like BEAST/B2ST, which may have been out of the spotlight for a period of time. The notable exception is EXO, who fans identify as a group that they live and a favorite group. EXO debuted in 2011, and has managed to create a level of fan loyalty equal to more established K-pop groups.

So, what does this mean? It seems to suggest that fans of K-pop make choices about the degree of their fan loyalty based on the longevity of the group. K-pop group longevity (or how long a group has been active) makes a difference to fans. This has long-term implications for how K-pop continues to be promoted. Agencies who focus on churning out new groups without cultivating the fandom may see less of an impact than agencies who take time to establish a long-term fan relationship between artists and fans. Such activities may include creating the fan name so that fans can identify with a particular group, creating behind-the-scene shows where fans can see artists when they are not performing, and creating other opportunities for artists to remain in the public eye, such as endorsements and television appearances.

Images:

“BigBang, Love Song (Korea.com),” Hallyu Harmony, accessed July 14, 2014, http://kpop.omeka.net/items/show/347.

“EXO, Promo Dark Sky (seoulbeats),” Hallyu Harmony, accessed July 14, 2014, http://kpop.omeka.net/items/show/369.

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Like Vs. Love: Research Reveals Degrees of Attachment Among K-pop Fans by Crystal S. Anderson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial 4.0 International License.

Hallyu Harmony Update: Super Junior, It’s You Dance Version

SUPERJUNIOR_kpophotline
The choreography for “It’s You” demonstrates several strategies that showcase the dance moves of the 11 members of Super Junior featured in this video.  The video uses the large number of members, repeatedly breaking them up into smaller groups to perform choreography and punctuating the overall choreography with synchronized dancing and individualized performances. . . . Read more and see video at Hallyu Harmony.

Bring The Boys Out!: Fan Attitudes on Male Kpop Groups Differ

Big Band and Super Junior
Big Bang and Super Junior

By Crystal S. Anderson, PhD

Elon University, NC (U.S).

Some people think that male K-pop groups are all the same. However, research suggests that fans differ in their attitudes towards individual male K-pop groups. Responses collected from fans of Super Junior and BigBang reveal that they also hold different opinions on their music and group dynamic.  Such responses suggest that while some do not distinguish between male K-pop groups, fans do.

Media Representations of Male K-pop Groups

Because many male K-pop groups are idol groups, they tend to be painted with the same broad, generalized brush.  Sometimes, they are described as being too similar to each other. An editorial in The Korea Times, suggests that people “seem fed up with similar ‘idol’ dance groups cropping up like mushroom[s].”

Other times, they are seen as promoting the same musical style or image.  Part of this is attributed to the training program Korean agencies use for idols. Solee I. Shin and Lanu Kim argue that “constant monitoring of the tastes and preferences of the consumers and factoring the successful elements back into the products. . . [make] successful products increasingly predictable and. . . homogenizes the entire domestic music scene.” Nabeela at seoulbeats echoes the concern about groups being the same by speculating about “how much of the content in K-entertainment is standardized and recycled.”

Fan Responses

However, a comparison of the responses from fans of Super Junior and BigBang reveals that fans like the groups for different reasons. This data represents a convenience sample collected via an online survey between December 8, 2012 and May 1, 2013. Respondents were asked to explain why they considered themselves a fan of the respective groups. 80 respondents identified themselves as fans of Super Junior, and 119 respondents identified themselves as fans of BigBang.  Of these 199 respondents, 95.7% were women and 4.3% were men.  Participants were: Asian (42.3%), White (41.2%), Latino (8.4%) and Black (7.9%).  They largely hail from the United States, Hungary, United Kingdom, Philippines and Australia.  Respondents range in age: 32.6% were 16-18, 31.6% were 18-21, 12.8% were 22-25, 14.4% were 25-30 and 8.6% were 30 and over. This data was analyzed using phenomenological methods.

Music

Both fandoms cite music as a major factor in the appeal of the groups, but Super Junior fans liked the upbeat nature of the music, while BigBang fans valued the edgy and unique nature of the group’s music.

Super Junior fans like the cheerful nature of the music.  One respondent noted:  “I can listen to their songs any time even if I sad or depressed” (Anderson).  Another stated:  “Their music always makes me smile no matter how depressed I am” (Anderson).  Super Junior fans also cited the pop-oriented style that the group reflects, as well as a range of styles.    One respondent  wrote:  “Their music has gone from happy, bubbly pop to funky dance tracks”  (Anderson).

Reviews of Super Junior albums reveal that the group is generally known for pop-oriented fare that also ranges across genres.  Jung Bae describes their 2012 release, Mr. Simple, as “cleanly divided into club/dance and pop ballad(s),” where singles like “Opera” are “a standout, paced by an intoxicating stutter beat and a sublime sense of kinetic energy throughout.” Emily Wu references the “Super Junior Funky Style” in her review of the album:  “It contains a catchy and addicting tune and melody that is sure to grab your attention from the get-go.” 

BigBang fans focused more on the unique nature of the music. Some cited the specific genre of hip-hop as a major reason for the appeal of the group. One respondent noted:  “Their style of music is what I enjoy most in American music, even if I don’t listen to American music as much anymore. Hip hop and R&B were genres that I grew up on but then it started changing too much for me. But Big Bang has a style to them that makes me love the genre all over again” (Anderson).   Such opinions dovetail into another theme that emerged from the responses, namely, the unique nature of the group in respect to BigBang’s music. One respondent noted: “Their music caught me when I first listened to it and it is nice to listen to whenever I want to something different then the usual Kpop” (Anderson). Another noted:  “Their music is distinguishable and stands out amist all of Kpop” (Anderson). BigBang has a reputation for being more adventurous in terms of their music.

Ashleigh Gregory describes the 2011 album Alive as partaking in a range of genres:  “This album combines a variety of safe, pop style songs and pairs them up with slightly more experimental electro sounding tracks that create a great mix and leaves you wanting to replay the album as soon as it’s done.” Such eclecticism makes its way into their live shows as well. Jon Caramanica writes: “The band wove an interpolation of the signature guitar crunch of Nirvana’s “Smells Like Teen Spirit” into a song. Multiple members of the group beatbox, a technique that’s hardly, if ever, used in mainstream American hip-hop, its birthplace, but is a routine part of the K-pop star arsenal.”

Group Dynamic

Both fandoms cite group dynamic as another major factor in the appeal of the groups, but Super Junior fans describe that dynamic in terms of cooperation and a close-knit bond, while BigBang fans focus on the individual members’ contribution to the group.

Super Junior
Super Junior

Despite the large number of members, Super Junior fans described the group as close-knit.  Some respondents focused on how they act as one or a team.  One respondent noted:   “They have their own personality but still can be one” (Anderson).  Another wrote:  “Not typical boyband material.  They have a strong bond despite being a huge group” (Anderson).  Other respondents focused on the close bond between members and several used the metaphor of family.    One wrote:  “Watching their bond as a group really influenced me. Seeing how they trust each other.  I can feel and see their brotherly love, how they care about each other” (Anderson).  Another wrote:  “Super Junior are a big group because they have lots of members but despite that they all get along like a family” (Anderson).  Another responded:  “What I really like from them is their close relationship with each other. They are truly like a family, they’re like brothers” (Anderson).

This may be related to fans watching Super Junior’s participation in extra-musical activities in the form of television and radio appearances.  Members of Super Junior hosted and/or starred in the Korean variety show Strong Heart from 2009-2012 and the radio show Kiss the Radio from 2006 to the present.  In these spaces, fans develop opinions about the dynamic between the members.   One respondent wrote:  “I understand and love that they’re an entertainment group with members doing radio shows, acting, variety shows and hosting! This has given me the chance to get to know them through many mediums and it’s reassuring to know that at least a few members are still active during their non-promotional period!” (Anderson).  In addition to scripted shows, Super Junior also appears on variety shows, which are often based on improvisation and require more participation.  One respondent noted:  “I didn’t actually like Super Junior much at first, but I kept watching them on variety shows that I liked and the SJ members were always making me laugh so much” (Anderson).

BigBang
BigBang

While fans of BigBang cite group dynamic as part of the appeal of the group, they focus on the individual members within the group.  Most respondents focused on the unique nature of the individual members.  One wrote:  “I also like how distinct the members are from each other” (Anderson).  Another said:  “Each member has their own talents and strengths when it comes to vocally and lyric writing and Big Bang along with YG utilizes that talent extremely well” (Anderson).  Still another wrote: “Each of the members have very different but equally interesting styles from their style of singing to the dancing” (Anderson).  Others cited individual members as part of their reason for liking the group.  Of these responses, the largest number cited G-Dragon as their reason for liking the group.  One respondent noted:  “G-Dragon has also been very successful on his own drawing me into the group as a whole” (Anderson).  Another noted:  “G-Dragon is probably one of the reasons why I like Big Bang so much. I like the music he produces and I appreciate that a lot since not all groups produce their own music. The fact that someone from the group produces their own music is pretty awesome” (Anderson).

What Does It Mean?

Fans of Super Junior like the group because they are traditional idol group. They like the pop nature of their music.  They value the camaraderie they see within the group as a result of television and radio appearances.   In contrast, fans of BigBang like the group because they challenge this notion of a traditional idol group.  Despite being the product of the same kind of training system that produced Super Junior, they see the group as more innovative and creative in their music.  They perceive the group as a collection of individuals rather than a cohesive unit. Because of the fewer number of television appearances, their fans may not develop the same kind of sense of camaraderie among the group.

Fans of Super Junior and BigBang represent just two individual K-pop fandoms, but this comparison suggests that fans do not view male K-pop groups in the same way.

Images: 1, 2, 3

Video

“BIGBANG – FANTASTIC BABY M/V.” 6 Mar 2012. YouTube. Web. 19 Dec 2013.

“Super Junior 슈퍼주니어_Mr.Simple_MUSICVIDEO.” 3 Aug 2011. YouTube. Web. 19 Dec 2013.

Sources

Anderson, Crystal. “Super Junior/BigBang Data Set.” Unpublished raw data.

Bae, Jung. “Album Review: Super Junior – Mr. Simple” hellokpop. 12 Aug 2011. Web. 19 Dec 2013.

Caramanica, Jon. “BigBang Performs at the Prudential Center.” The New York Times. 9 Nov 2012.

Gregory, Ashleigh.  “[UnitedKpop K-pop Album Review] March: BigBang – Alive.” UnitedKpop. 26  Mar 2012.

Nabeela. “Does Hallyu Only Have a Short Time Left on a Global Stage?” seoulbeats. 27 May 2012. Web. 19 Dec 2013.

Shin, Solee I. and Lanu Kim. “Organizing K-pop: Emergence and Market Making of Large Korean Entertainment Houses, 1980-2010.” East Asia (December 2013): doi 10.1007/s12140-013-9200-0.

“Will ‘Hallyu’ Last Long?” The Korea Times. 10 Aug 2012. Web. 19 Dec 2013.

Wu, Emily. “Album Review: Super Junior – Mr. Simple. ” Ningin (blog). 2  Aug 2011. Web. 19 Dec 2013.

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Bring The Boys Out!: Fan Attitudes on Male Kpop Groups Differ by Crystal S. Anderson is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.

iFans Case Studies Status Update

Infographic based on data collected by Crystal S. Anderson as part of the iFans research study
Infographic based on data collected by Crystal S. Anderson as part of the iFans research study

If you keep with research on K-pop, you may be aware of the iFans: Mapping Kpop’s International Fandom project.  The surveys that make up the qualitative studies seek to understand how the fandoms differ from one another and their relationship to the groups they support. K-pop fans know that the fandoms are unique. Because they have detailed knowledge of the groups they support, they provide a unique perspective on the appeal of their respective groups. Too often, commentators make assumptions about K-pop fans, while the iFans studies goes to the source: the fans.

As the chart above shows, fans of 2NE1 and BigBang have participated the most in the surveys, while fans of Shinhwa and Aziatix have participated the least.   Other groups with high participation rates include SHINee and TVXQ, while other groups with low participation rates include Epik High and f(x).

These participation rates are interesting, because groups like Super Junior and Girls’ Generation have very active global fandoms, yet those numbers are not reflected in participation rates.  Rates may not reflect all fans, just fans who are likely to take (and complete) a survey.  Participation rates may be affected by the activity of the groups.

The iFans Case Studies survey is still active, and now, individuals can take the survey for multiple or  individual groups.

Now that a good deal of data has been collected, look for new research reports on what K-pop fans say about their favorite groups!

iFans: Mapping Kpop’s International Fandom

IFansOmekalogo

IFANS: Mapping K-pop’s International Fandom is a scholarly research project that examines global fan attitudes and activities through surveys, collection of information on online communities and analysis of websites.  Crystal S. Anderson, PhD (Elon University) is the Principal Investigator of the studies and Curator of the iFans project site.

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CONFERENCE ABSTRACT: The Cultural Politics of Asian/Americans in Kpop @ Association of Asian American Studies

A Far East Movement: The Cultural Politics of Asian/Americans in Kpop

Dr. Crystal S. Anderson

Association of Asian American Studies Conference, Washington, DC

April 11-14, 2012

ABSTRACT

With the global spread of Hallyu (global Korean cultural movement expressed through music, television dramas and film), many have focused on the reception of Korean culture by other countries.  However, there is also a reciprocal movement, one where Asian/Americans migrate to the Korean popular music scene, bringing a sensibility reflecting experiences as people of color in the United States AND members of an Asian diaspora.  This paper explores the complicated results of such movement.   On one hand, Korean American artists like Jay Park have encountered obstacles in navigating the Kpop scene. Initially a member of the all-male group 2PM, Park created controversy over his abrupt departure and subsequent negative comments about Koreans.  His experience suggests challenges in acculturating to what seems to be a foreign culture to him as an Asian American.  On the other hand, Korean artists born or raised in the United States (i.e. Hyesung, and Andy of  Shinhwa) or Canada (i.e. Henry of Super Junior) seem to avoid the kinds of troubles that Park encounters.  In addition, Asian American groups such as Aziatix have gained a measure of success in Kpop. My paper will explore factors that may account for this difference.  In addition, American producers such as Steven Lee regularly work behind the scenes making music that draws on American R&B and soul, while Korean producers such as Yoo Young Jin work with African Americans to create what can only be described as Korean soul.  What are the implications of this transnational movement of culture? Is the reception of these subjects in Kpop impacted by transnational cultural politics?

JOO


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BASICS

FANFACTS

VIDEOS

DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES

DISCOGRAPHY: JAPANESE RELEASES


BASICS

JOO (Jeong Min Joo) (Source: http://www.hancinema.net/korean_JOO-picture_144059.html)

 Name

 Jeong Min Joo (JOO)

 Debut

 2008

 Status

 Active

 Label

 JYP Entertainment

 Fan Name

 None

 Origin of Fan Name

 N/A

 Official Website

http://www.jype.com/#/joo/Profile.aspx

 Related Websites

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FAN FACTS

Official Fan Color: 

Awards

Television Appearances

Concert Tours

News
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VIDEOS

Ice Cream


Bad Boy


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DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES

  Joo and Leeteuk –  Ice Cream (May 16, 2011) (JYP Entertainment)

  1. 아이스크림
   Heartmade (January 1, 2011) (JYP Entertainment)

  1. 나쁜남자
  2. 물한잔도 마실 수 없어
  3. 영화도 안보니 (featuring 찬성)
  4. 마주치고 나서
  5. 꿈만 같아
  6. 나쁜남자 (Ins trumental)
   Brand New Diva (August 10, 2008) (JYP Entertainment)

  1. 남자 때문에
  2. 어제처럼
  3. 얼굴
  4. 초연(貂緣)
  5. 남자 때문에 (MR)
  6. 어제처럼 (MR)

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DISCOGRAPHY: JAPANESE RELEASES

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Zhang Liyin (Jang Ri-in)


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BASICS

FANFACTS

VIDEOS

DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES

DISCOGRAPHY: CHINESE RELEASES

DISCOGRAPHY: JAPANESE RELEASES


BASICS

Zhang Liyin (Source: http://milkroll.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/zhang-li-yin.jpg)

 Name

Zhang Liyin (Jang Ri-In)

 Debut

 2006

 Status

 Active

 Label

SM Entertainment

 Fan Name

 Chocolyn

 Origin of Fan Name

Derived from combining Chocolate (Zhang Li Yin’s fanclub name) and Zhang Li Yin’s name.

 Official Website

 Related Websites

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FAN FACTS

Official Fan Color:  Gold

Awards

2006

  • Rookie of the Month, Cyworld Digital Music Award: “Timeless”
  • Best New Solo Artist, M.NET/KM Music Festival: “Timeless”
2008
  • Female Newcomer with Most Potential, Mengniu Music King Awards: “星愿 (I Will)
  • Best Mainland Newcomer, Southeast Music Ranking
  • Most Fashionable Female Artist of the Year, 2008 Starlight Grand Ceremony
  • Most “Attention Grabbing” Newcomer, 1st Annual Mengniu New Music Festival: “星愿 (I Will)”

Television Appearances

Concert Tours

News
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VIDEOS

Moving On


Y


I Will


Timeless Part 2


Timeless Part 1

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DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES

  Dear My Love Original Soundtrack (November 11, 2008) (Avex)

2. 연인이여 (Love Theme)

  2007 Winter SMTOWN – Only Love (December 7, 2007) (SM Entertainment)

10. Oh Holy Night

  2007 Summer SMTOWN – Fragile (July 5, 2007) (SM Entertainment)

9. Under the Sea

  2006 Winter SMTOWN – Snow Dream (December 12, 2006) (SM Entertainment)

9. Heaven

   Timeless (September 8, 2006) (SM Entertainment)

  1. Timeless (featuring Xiah)
  2. Y (Why…)
  3. Timeless (featuring Xiah) (Instrumental)
  4. Y (Why…) (Instrumental)

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DISCOGRAPHY: CHINESE RELEASES

   Moving On (October 29, 2009) (SM Entertainment)

  1. 晴天, 雨天 (Moving On)
  2. 愛我 (Love Me)
  3. 晴天, 雨天 (Moving On) (Instrumental)
   I Will (March 8, 2008) (SM Entertainment)

  1. Intro (初戀)
  2. 初戀
  3. A Flame for You
  4. 星願 I Will
  5. 幸福的左岸
  6. 交错的爱/交錯的愛
  7. 相信愛
  8. 纯真的爱/純真的愛
  9. One More Try
  10. Y (Why…)
  11. Timeless

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DISCOGRAPHY: JAPANESE RELEASES

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