For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 6: INTERNET & SOCIAL MEDIA

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 6 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL + F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, and Part 5 of the bibliography.

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Photo credit: geralt, Pixabay.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Nakamura, Lisa. (2003). “Where do you want to go today?” Cybernetic tourism, the internet and transnationality. In G. Dines and J. M. Humez Gender, Race and Class in Media. (pp.684-687).Thousand Oaks: Sage Publications.

Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong. (2006). Living in Cyworld: Contextualising Cy-Ties in South Korea. In Bruns, Axel & Jacobs, Joanne (Eds.) Uses of Blogs. (pp. 173-186). New York: Peter Lang.

Ramesh, Bharadwaj. (2006). A Hallyu Story: Behind the origins and success of the Korean wave in China & the future of content in a broadband world. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://bit.ly/23ggIuk   

Farrer, James. (2007). Asian youth culture in a globalizing world: Networked and not inhibited. Global Asia, 2(1): 102-110. Accessed 17 June 2016 from https://www.globalasia.org/wp-content/uploads/2007/03/129.pdf

Kang, Seungmook & Hadong Kim. (2009). Korean traditional space creator for digital contents. The International Journal of Virtual Reality, 8(3): 33-37. Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.ijvr.org/issues/issue3-2009/6.pdf

Kim, Kyung Hee, Yun Haejin & Youngmin Yoon. (2009). The internet as a facilitator of cultural hybridization and interpersonal relationship management for Asian international students in South Korea. Asian Journal of Communication, 19(2): 152-169. Retrieved 16 June 2016 from http://bit.ly/1rstmZd

Cha, Hyunhee & Seongmook Kim. (2011). A case study on Korean wave: Focused on K-pop concert by Korean idol groups in Paris, June 2011. In T. Kim et. Al (Eds.) Multimedia, Computer Graphics, and Broadcasting. (pp. 153-162). Heidelberg: Springer.

Jung, Eun Young. (2012). New Wave formations: K-pop idol bands, social media and the remaking of the Korean Wave. Presented at the Nam Center for Korean Studies’ Hallyu 2.0: The Korean Wave in the Age of Social Media Symposium. Accessed 16 June 2016 from https://wwwprod.lsa.umich.edu/ncks/eventsprograms/conferencessymposia/hallyu20eunyoungjung_ci   

Jung, Sun. (2012). K-pop, Indonesian fandom, and social media. Transformative Works and Cultures,8. Accessed 16 June 2016 from http://journal.transformativeworks.org/index.php/twc/article/view/289  

Lee, Moonhaeng. (2012). Star management of talent agencies and social media in Korea. In M. Friedrichsen and W. Muhl-Benninghaus (Eds.) Handbook of Social Media Management. (pp.549-564) New York: Springer.

Oh, Ingyu & Gil-Sung Park. (2012). From B2C to B2B: Selling Korean pop music in the age of social media. Korea Observer, 43(3): 365-397.

Ahn, JoongHo, Sehwan Oh & Hyunjung Kim. (2013). Korean pop takes off! Social media strategy of Korean entertainment industry. 10th International Conference on Service Systems and Service Management. IEEE. Pp. 774-777. Doi 10.1109/ICSSSM.2013.6602528

Oh, Chong-jin & Young-gil Chae. (2013). Constructing culturally proximate spaces through social network services: The case of Hallyu (Korean Wave) in Turkey. International Relations / Uluslararasi Iliskiler, 10(38): 77-99.

Oh, Ingyu and Hyo Jung Lee. (2013). Mass media technologies and popular music genres. K-pop and YouTube. Korea Journal, 53(4): 34-58. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://www.iwahs.org/research/data/3)%20Mass%20Media%20Technologies%20and%20Popular%20Music%20Genres%20K-pop%20and%20YouTube,%20Ingyu%20OH%20and.pdf

Jin, Dal Yong & Kyong Yoon. (2014). The social mediascape of transnational Korean pop culture: Hallyu 2.0 as spreadable media practice. New Media & Society. Doi: 10.1177/1461444814554895.

Kim, Minjeong, Yun-Cheol Heo, Seong-Cheol Choi & Han Woo Park. (2014). Comparative trends in global communication networks of #Kpop tweets. Quantity & Quality, 48(5): 2687-2702. Doi 10.1007/s11135-013-9918-1.

Kim, Yong Hwan, Dahee Lee, Nam Gi Hong & Min Song. (2014). Exploring characteristics of video consuming behavior in different social media using K-pop videos. Journal of Information Science, 40(6): 806-822.

Kim, Yonghwan, Dahee Lee, Jung Eun Hahm, Namgi Han & Min Song. (2014). Investigating socio-cultural behavior of users reflected in different social channels on K-pop. Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on World Wide Web. (pp. 325-326). Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?id=2577324  Doi 10.1145/2567948.2577324

Seong, Cheol Choi, Xanat Vargas Meza & Han Woo Park. (2014). South Korean culture goes Latin America: Social network analysis of Kpop tweets in Mexico. International Journal of Contents, 10(1): 36-42.

Sung, Jun. (2014). Youth, social media and transnational cultural distribution: The case of online K-pop circulation. In A. Bennett and B. Robards (Eds.) Mediated Youth Cultures. (pp. 114-129). New York: Springer.

Hebrona, Matthew Niel. (2015). Ermagerd! Oppa so hot: Examining K-pop through Internet memes. Master’s thesis. The Graduate School of the Catholic University of Korea. Accessed 7 April 2020 from https://www.academia.edu/25809417/Ermahgerd_Oppa_so_Hot_Examining_K-Pop_through_Internet_Memes

Song, Min, Yoo Kyung Jeong & Ha Jin Kim. (2015). Identifying the topology of the K-pop video community on YouTube: A combined co-comment analysis approach. Journal of the Association for Information Science & Technology, 66(12): 2580-2595.

Xu, Weiai Wayne, Ji Young Park & Han Woo Park. (2015). The networked cultural diffusion of Korean wave. Online Information Review, 39(1): 43-60.

Baek, Young Min. (2016). Relationship between cultural distance and cross-cultural music video consumption on YouTube. Social Science Computer Review, 33(6): 730-748.

Kim, Grace MyHyun. (2016). Practicing multilingual identities: Online interactions in a Korean dramas forum. International Multilingual Research Journal, 10(4): 254-272.

King, Elizabeth. (2016). Kpop Twitter: group identity in a globalized space. Master’s Thesis, Ball State University. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://cardinalscholar.bsu.edu/handle/123456789/200254

Yecies, Brian, Jie Yang, Aegyung Kim, Kai Soh & Matthew Berryman. (2016). The Douban online social media barometer and the Chinese reception of Korean popular media flows. Participants: Journal of Audience & Reception Studies, 13(1): 114-138. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://www.participations.org/Volume%2013/Issue%201/6.pdf

Yoon, Kyong & Dal Yong Jin. (2016). The Korean wave phenomenon in Asian diasporas in Canada. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 37(1): 69-83.

Abd-Rahim, Atiqah. (2019). Online fandom: Social identity and social hierarchy of hallyu fans. The Journal for Undergraduate Ethnography, 9(1). Accessed 7 April 2020 from https://ojs.library.dal.ca/JUE/article/view/8885

Crow, Teahlyn Frances. (2019). K-pop, language, and online fandom: An exploration of Korean language use and performativity amongst international K-pop fans. Thesis, Northern Arizona University. 

Utami, Evi Farsiah. (2019). Social media, celebrity, and fans: A study of Indonesian K-pop fans. Thesis, Taylor’s University. 

Song, Min. (n.d.) Detecting topology of K-pop stars on YouTube with bigdata analytics. Accessed 17 June 2016 from http://informatics.yonsei.ac.kr/tsmm/download/Presentation_Youtube_Kpop_131210.pdf

Happy Reading!

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The Digital Documentation Project: An Update

The Digital Documentation Project: An Update

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

During KPK’s early days in 2011, Dr. Anderson and other KPK founders were having quite a difficult time accessing some Kpop entertainment companies’ artist websites.  They kept encountering what they called, “the circle of death,” and then timing out. I wasn’t having this problem and had just discovered the Screencast-O-Matic tool, so I decided to record the sites and send the video links to my KPK colleagues.

Interweb troubles in 2011....DD to the rescue!
Interweb troubles in 2011….DD to the rescue!

And that is how the the KPK Digital Documentation (DD) project was born.

While the original intent of my website recordings was to share the Kpop website love, I quickly realized that recording Kpop websites could be useful in other ways: to track changes in Kpop web design, to understand how Korean entertainment companies use websites to engage Korean and international Kpop fans, and what roles these sites seem to play in the company’s larger business, marketing, and promotional plans  – particularly when it comes to attracting new talent and integrating social media channels and tools.

Process

Recording websites can take between 2 to 15 minutes per site- occasionally more if the website is dense.  I choose to record the websites without sound in order to avoid copyright infringement and so that visitors may enjoy and engage in unbiased viewing or analysis of the website.   In Kpop, many artists and groups release several music projects a year, so I keep up with Kpop news outlets to find out about debuts and comebacks, and I try to record the different websites for each project. In this way, the DD project creates depth not only by seeking out general trends, but also monitoring the evolution of individual groups and artists. Additionally, if artists and groups promote in Japan, I record those websites if they are available.

Recording B1A4's latest website. See Screencast-O-Matic interface (dotted lines, recording control panel).
Recording B1A4’s latest website. See Screencast-O-Matic interface (dotted lines, recording control panel).

Website Differences

One of the first things I noticed is that SM Entertainment was the only company that still gave historical access to websites supporting their early artists (Shinhwa, S.E.S., Yoo Joung Jin, etc.), so I quickly recorded those websites. It’s a good thing that I did, because in 2012, the company completely redesigned their website, removing any content about artists who were not currently on their roster.  SM Entertainment continues to allow access to the older websites of groups who are still on their roster (e.g., Girls Generation, SHINee, TVXQ! etc.); additionally this company provides links to modified liner notes (e.g., lyrics, music publishing information, etc.).  Those sites have been recorded for posterity, as well.

In contrast, other companies like YG Entertainment or FNC Music Entertainment only offer current editions of artists websites – that is, viewers only have access to the current promotional concept of a group or artist, even if some historical information may be available (see below). Additionally, some companies (Starship Entertainment, TS Entertainment) only offer quick profile information about their artists on their websites. Instead they choose to use Cafe Daum’s “internet cafe” sites, which act as a hybrid website/forum, to promote their artists. Since Cafe Daum Official Kpop artist sites are generally designed to reach Korean Kpop fans, I do not record these sites for KPK.

Website Commonalities

Despite these differences, most Kpop artist websites have common elements:

  • Artist profiles (member names, birthdays, blood type, hobbies)
  • Discography lists
  • Photo galleries
  • Music snippets
  • Activity calendars
  • Social media links (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and until mid-2014, Me2day)
  • Links to online music purchasing and downloading sites (e.g., Melon, Olleh, iTunes)
  • Message boards (from the artists, their staff, and for fan-to-fan communication)
  • Official fanclub portals and exclusive content (often password protected)
  • International language options (default language is Korean with some English)
  • Links to the company’s business site, which include audition information

From Collection to Curation

B1A4 Kpopiana exhibit with Digital Documentation links.
B1A4 Kpopiana exhibit with Digital Documentation links.

When this project first began, KPK members were more engaged in collecting information, so DD videos were listed on the KPK website, separately from the artist profiles. As we move on to curation activities, these video links are now included in KPOPIANA artist exhibits.  At press time, KPK has a DD library of almost 500 Kpop artist websites, from all kinds of Korean entertainment companies and encompassing all kinds of artists, Kpop choreographers, some international fansites,  and even Kdrama actors. Currently we are focused on releasing DD items pertaining to Kpop artists, with plans to include other items in the future.   The Library of Congress (n.d.) notes that the average length of a website is about 44 days. Considering the frenetic pace of music production in Kpop, this length may sometimes be shortened, making the DD project a useful tool in the study of Hallyu and its life on the Internet.  

 Click to learn more about the DD project, or you may contact me anytime.

Sources

Library of Congress. (n.d.). Importance of digital preservation: Special presentation. Accessed April 17, 2014, from http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/about/presentation.html.

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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Oppa – Don’t Approve SOPA!

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

By the time this post is published, Wikipedia (the English site) will not be accessible. That’s right, the place where you go to gather preliminary information on everything from the history of the letter “A” to breaking down the MBLAQ acronym will be blacked out on January 18, 2012. When you go to the community-driven Internet-based encyclopedia, all you will see is a black screen. That means for 24 hours, you won’t be able to access quick biographical information about Shakespeare or Martin Luther King, hear what a kayagum sounds like, or see the latest geographical or cultural statistics of Taiwan.Why? Because the site, along with other companies like Google, Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn, are actively protesting the proposal of pieces of legislation called SOPA and PIPA.

Wikipedia implementing a 24-hour Black Out to protest proposed SOPA/PIPA legislation  (January 18, 2012).

Continue reading “Oppa – Don’t Approve SOPA!”