Sunny Hill


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BASICS

L to R: Jang Hyun, Kota, Ju Bi, Seung Ah, Misung; Photo Credit: http://lovelaughlisten.wordpress.com/2011/06/06/spotlight-sunny-hill-joins-the-midnight-circus/
Name Sunny Hill
Meaning of Name Unclear
Members
  • Jang Hyun (Kim Jang Hyun, leader)
  • Seung Ah (Lee Seung Ah)
  • Ju Bi (Kim Eun Young)
  • Misung (Lee Mi Sung)
  • Kota (Ahn Jin Ah, maknae)
Debut September 20, 2007
Status Active
Label Nega Network (2007-2010), LOEN Entertainment (2010-present)
Fan Name
  • HːLLЁR (Pronounced “Hiller”, official)
  • Sunshines
Origin of Fan Name
  • Originally fans called themselves ‘Sunshines,’ but during the group’s comeback in 2011 the official fancafe voted to change the name to HːLLЁR.
Fan Club Website(s)
Related Websites

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FAN FACTS

  • Sunny Hill originally debuted in 2007 as a 3-member group with Jang Hyun, Ju Bi, and Seung Ah. Kota was added in 2010, and Misung was added in 2011.
  • Jang Hyun was one of the 5 winners of Let’s Coke Play Battle Shinhwa! and was accepted into the group Battle. He left to go to university before the group debuted.
  • The group was featured in  the music video for Narsha’s (from Brown Eyed Girls) Mama Mia
  • The female members of Sunny Hill recorded an OST for the drama The Greatest Love in 2011 called “Pit-a-Pat”

Awards

2007

  • Cyworld Digital Music Awards – Rookie of the Month

2011

  • 3rd Melon Music Awards – Music Style Best OST (“Pit-a-pat” for The Greatest Love)


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VIDEOS

Pray


Midnight Circus


Love is All I Know


Ringback Tone


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DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES

Pray (Release Date: August 5, 2011)(Label: LOEN Entertainment)

  1. 기도(Pray)
  2. 기도(Pray) – Instrumental Ver.
  Midnight Circus (Release Date: June 9, 2011)(Label: LOEN Entertainment)

  1. Girl with an Accordian (Intro)
  2. 꼭두각시 (Puppetry)
  3. Midnigh Circus
  4. Let’s Talk About (feat. Jia)
  5. 기도 (Pray) – Preview
  6. Midnight Circus – Instrumental Ver.
  2008 Is My Summer (Release Date: July 3, 2008)(Label: Nega Network)

  1. 사랑밖엔 난 몰라 (Love is All I Know)
  2. 고무줄 (Sub. COOL하게 컴백 – Comeback) [Elastic, or Cool Makes a Comeback]
  3. My Girl
  4. 사랑밖엔 난 몰라 (Love is All I Know) – Instrumental Ver.
  5. 고무줄 (Sub. COOL하게 컴백 – Comeback) [Elastic, or Cool Makes a Comeback] – Instrumental Ver.
  6. My Girl – Instrumental Ver.
  Winter Story (Release Date: November 15, 2007)(Label: Nega Network)

  1. Winter Story
  2. Winter Story – Instrumental Ver.
  Love Letter (Release Date: September 20, 2007)(Label: Nega Network)

  1. 너니까 (You’re the One)
  2. Good-bye New York
  3. 통화 연결음 (Ringback Tone)
  4. 가버려 (Just Walk Away)
  5. 너니까 (You’re the One) – Instrumental Ver.
  6. Good-bye New York – Instrumental Ver.
  7. 통화 연결음 (Ringback Tone) – Instrumental Ver.
  8. 가버려 (Just Walk Away) – Instrumental Ver.


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Vanilla Lucy


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DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES


BASICS

L to R: Ji Yeon, Hye Ra, Silver, Sora; Not pictured: Da Hae Photo Credit: http://vanillalucy.co.kr
Name Vanilla Lucy
Meaning of Name Unclear
Members
  • Hye Ra (Yoo Hye Ra, cello)
  • Da Hae (Bae Da Hae, vocals)*
  • Ji Yeon (Oh Ji Yeon, violin)
  • Silver (Eun Hwa, vocals)
  • Sora (Jung Sora, saxophone)

* – former member

Debut April 13, 2010
Status Active
Label Hanmaek (HM) Entertainment (2010-present)
Fan Name N/A
Origin of Fan Name N/A
Fan Club Website(s)
Related Websites

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VIDEOS

French Love (feat. Baega) – Korean Ver.


Fly Girls


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DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES

 Vanilla Party (Label: Sony Music Korea)(Release Date: June 17, 2011)

  1. Vanilla Party
  2. Happy Song
  3. Happy Song – Acoustic Ver.
  4. Vanilla Party – Instrumental Ver.
  5. Happy Song – Instrumental Ver.
   Happy Song (Label: Sony Music Korea)(Release Date:May 27, 2011)

  1. Happy Song
  2. Happy Song – Acoustic Ver.
   Vanilla Shake (Label: Sony Music Korea)(Release Date: June 3, 2010)

  1. Intro
  2. Lover Tonight
  3. French Love (feat. Baega) – Korean Ver.
  4. Fly Girls
  5. Lucid Dream
  6. Listen to the Music
  7. French Love – English Ver.
  8. Listen to the Music – Instrumental Ver.
  9. Sky in My Heart
  10. Romantist (outro)
 Flying Girls (Label: Sony Music Korea)(Release Date: April 13, 2010)

  1. Fly Girls
  2. Fly Girls – Acoustic Ver.


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CO-ED SCHOOL


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DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES


BASICS

L to R: Hyoyoung, Yoosung, Soomi, Taewoon, Sungmin, Noori, Chanmi, Kangho*, Hye Won, Kwangheng; Not Pictured: Jongkook; Photo Credit: http://www.aanews.kr/news/quickViewArticleView.html?idxno=2711
Name CO-ED SCHOOL
Meaning of Name They are a mixed-gender Kpop group, consisting of 5 girls and 6 boys
Members
  • Soo Mi (Lee Soomi, leader)
  • Kwang Heng (Lee Kwang Heng)
  • Yoosung (Kim Jungwoo)
  • Taewoon (Woo Taewoon)
  • Kangho (Park Yongsu)*
  • Chanmi (Heo Chanmi)
  • Noori (Kang Inho)
  • Hyoyoung (Ryu Hyoyoung)
  • Hye Won (Jin Hye Won)
  • Sungmin (Choi Sungmin, [male] maknae)
  • Eunkyo (Seo Eunkyo, [female] maknae)
  • Shin Jongkook**

* – former member

** – debuting member

Debut September 30, 2010
Status Active
Label Core Contents Entertainment (2010 – present)
Fan Name
  • Classmates (unofficial)
Origin of Fan Name
  • It’s an unofficial fan name.
Fan Club Website(s)
Related Websites

Continue reading “CO-ED SCHOOL”

Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities Abstract: “My Pretty Prince! Gender-role Gymnastics in the Shojo Manga Series Otomen”

Originally written for Em Bee Bee. Published October 18, 2011.


Hello everyone!

Sorry it’s been so long since I’ve posted anything on my site! A lot of things have been going on – including looking at graduate schools – but one of the most exciting things that has happened is…

I’m taking Otomen to Hawaii!

Dr. Anderson helped me craft the work I’ve done on Otomen into an abstract for the 2012 Hawaii International Conference on Arts & Humanities. So if you’re going to be at the conference, look me up! The title is  My Pretty Prince! Gender-role Gymnastics in the Shojo Manga Series Otomen. Here’s the abstract below:

Scholars take opposite positions on women’s roles in shojo manga, or Japanese comics aimed at younger women, either praising or criticizing female gender role expectations. Some scholars, such as Kukhee Choo, argue that the roles occupied by female characters advocate traditional female gender roles and thereby hinder women’s autonomy by perpetuating traditional stereotypes. Yet a few other scholars, such as Matt Thorn, state that these manga inspire more autonomy, since they can often feature a seemingly ordinary young girl overcoming extraordinary conflicts. However, neither position explores the range of male gender role expectations in shojo manga. In my paper, I examine Otomen, a shojo manga that features a male protagonist. Because it is a shojo manga that focuses on men, it pits the traditional Japanese understandings of male and female gender role expectations against each other, exploring them through the ‘girly’ protagonist Masamune Asuka and his relationship with his ‘ungirly’ female love interest Miakozuka Ryo. I specifically explore Asuka’s struggles between his hyper-masculine persona, created in response to pressure to conform to traditional societal gender expectations, and his inner feminine interests, thereby occupying a space between masculine and feminine.

Again, thanks to Crystal Anderson for…well, getting me into the conference! The abstract would not sound as professional as it does without her help! ♡

Boys Over Flowers: Episodes 8-12 – And Now, It’s Serious.

Hello everybody!

So, I’ve been slacking off on getting my part of the BOF episode reviews out there, partly because I need to get used to the new format of reviewing a few episodes at a time. You know me, I love being really, really detailed! Anyway, let’s see if I can do this right:

Is this an awkward picture? 😉

In this section of the drama, things get really serious, really quickly. At this point, even though the evil Madam Kang has done some pretty underhanded plotting, nothing really drastic and dramatic has happened to try and keep Jan Di and Jun Pyo apart. But in these 5 episodes, there seems to be 2 themes: Ordinary, everyday happiness and super dramatic, malicious danger.

SO EVIL!

At this point, Jan Di is pretty set on being with Jun Pyo (leaving poor Ji Hoo out in the cold… AGAIN) and so there are a lot of cute moments when Jun Pyo experiences what an unprivileged, normal life is. My favorite part of this is when Jun Pyo forces Jan Di and her family to let him stay the night at their house. This is an important sequence because Jun Pyo is not only taking in the way that ‘common’ people live, but he’s also really enjoying his experience – it’s the first time he’s ever been around an actual family, and he loves it.

Madam Kang comes back into the picture, though, and really brings about a lot of serious, and scary, trouble. She uses her more devious connections to put Jan Di (and therefore Jun Pyo) into some really deep trouble. Kang runs Jan Di’s family out of their dry cleaning business, and then hires thugs to go and destroy their makeshift roadside snacks stand. Jun Pyo proves that, reputable business or no, he’s still in love with Jan Di and will forsake his family’s reputation to be with his love.

So, Madam Kang tries a more complicated – and more dangerous – approach. She arranges for Jan Di to meet an unknown freshman at Shinhwa High – Jae Ha – who is secretly a popular model.

It's a shame that he's so evil, but so cute...

At one point, Jan Di gets trapped in a chemistry lab at school and is almost suffocated by poisonous gasses that are leaked into the room, which has been completely locked and sealed. Jae Ha comes in the nick of time to save her, but that’s all part of the plot to get her to trust him (because you know she has a thing for people who come to her rescue – in fact, she calls him her black knight! Gee, I wonder who her white knight would be…) Jae Ha, however, is not only Madam Kang’s lackey, but is also the brother of the man Jan Di saves WAY back in Episode 1.

Because she saved his brother, he tries to keep Jan Di out of real danger, and even tries to kiss her at one point (she rejects him). But because she refuses to leave Jun Pyo, Jae Ha has to go forward with Madam Kang’s plan. Combined with Madam Kang’s orders to break them up and his own desire for revenge on Jun Pyo, Jae Ha eventually kidnaps Jan Di (after she resists his advances, of course) and forces Jun Pyo to come ‘rescue her’ in an abandoned warehouse.

Here’s the serious part: aside from all the beatings that Jan Di endured in the first episodes, no one has gotten seriously injured at this point. All that is about to change. This whole episode with the kidnapping and the warehouse is just the beginning of the more serious danger.  Jun Pyo allows himself to be beaten to a pulp by Jae Ha and his fellow Jun Pyo-haters, so that Jan Di will stay safe. Jan Di, though, throws herself on top of Jun Pyo just before one of the guys brings a chair down on him – instead, Jan Di receives the blow on her shoulder, and passes out.

The serious violence doesn’t stop there – later on, Jan Di puts her own life in danger by going out in a blizzard during a school-sponsored ski trip in order to look for a special necklace that Jun Pyo gave her. The necklace – which is gorgeous, by the way – was actually stolen by one of the three main Plastics, who then tell Jan Di that she must have lost it at the top of the mountain earlier that day.

The necklace

Jan Di almost freezes in the blizzard, alone, trying to look for the necklace because she knows that Jun Pyo will be furious with her. Jun Pyo comes and saves her, though (although Ji Hoo would have done so, had Woo Bin and Yi Jung not stopped him for his own safety) and they wait out the rest of the blizzard together in the ski patrol’s lodge at the top of the mountain.

Episode 12 ends with Jun Pyo on a plane to China, where his father has had a heart attack and collapsed, so he and Madam Kang are going over there to be with him and to help run the company. Ji Hoo has tried to get Jan Di to the airport to see him and say goodbye, but they’re too late. So she cries about how she didn’t get to tell him that she liked him while Ji Hoo comforts her. And you know what that means – the love triangle is still going strong!

By the end of these episodes, we’re fairly certain that Jan Di has decided on Jun Pyo, despite the serious danger that his mother has put her through again and again, but this new development about his father  collapsing and his sudden trip to China jeopardizes their relationship and offers Ji Hoo yet another chance to try and win her heart completely. Will Jan Di and Jun Pyo be able to have a long-distance relationship? Will Madam Kang finally get her wish and separate the two of them forever? Will Ji Hoo actually win Jan Di over? Find out in the next review!

Kim Kyu Jong


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BASICS

Credit: http://static.allkpop.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/09/20110927_kimkyujong_1.jpg
Name Kim Kyu Jong (sometimes JDream)
Debut September 27, 2011
Status Active
Label B2M Entertainment (2010-present)
Fan Name ThanKyu
Origin of Fan Name Being thankful for the existence of each other all the time; forever grateful.
Official Website http://www.kyu-jong.com/
Related Websites http://www.facebook.com/pages/Kim-Kyujongs-Land/132391480127515

Continue reading “Kim Kyu Jong”

Daesung

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BASICS

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BASICS

Photo credit: http://www.gokpop.com/news/yg-entertainment-reveals-daesung-was-not-at-fault-in-accident::8026.html
Name Daesung (Kang Dae Sung)
Debut June 17, 2008
Status On Hiatus
Label YG Entertainment (2008-present)
Fan Name None
Origin of Fan Name N/A
Official Website
Related Websites

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VIDEOS

Look at Me, Gwisoon


It’s a Big Hit!


Cotton Candy


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DISCOGRAPHY: KOREAN RELEASES

  Daesung Digital Single (Released: June 17, 2008)(Label: YG Entertainment)

  1. Look at Me, Gwisoon
  2. It’s a Big Hit!
  3. Cotton Candy


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Let’s talk about “Let’s Talk About…”

여러분 안녕하세요! Hi everyone!

We’ve had a LOT of traffic on the site, which has been really exciting for us since we’ve been wanting to talk to you!

We were trying to figure out a way that we could give you, our wonderful friends, a space where you could talk about Kpop. We’re not a forum, and frankly those things are CRAZY, but we want to let you really speak up on Kpop and tell us what you think!

So, we’ve created the “Let’s Talk About…” just for you! It’s a section where we’ll post interesting questions for you guys to talk about. Don’t worry, we’ll still be here, but these questions are for YOU. Let your voice be heard!

Do you have suggestions for a “Let’s Talk About…”? Send an email to us at kpopkollective@gmail.com! We’ll take your suggestions and put them up, just like we did for KeysKay for the first one 🙂

Let’s talk!

An Idol Army: Thoughts On The Mega Group

Too many!

That’s what a lot of netizens say when offering an opinion on new or returning idol groups with extremely large numbers. They may have a point, but I also think that there is something to be gained from mega Kpop group.

While fans are always noting the sheer number of idol groups that debut, they seem to be especially sensitive to groups with large numbers. Five members may be ideal, but when numbers start to climb beyond that, as it does with groups such as U-Kiss (seven members), T-ara (seven members), Infinite (seven members) , ZE:A (nine members) and After School (nine members), people get antsy.  Given their success, fans seem to have accepted the large numbers in SNSD and Super Junior, but that was not easily achieved. So I wasn’t surprised at the reaction to newer, larger Kpop groups. Something seemed to snap in fans when Golden Goose Entertainment announced plans for a Japanese debut for APeace (formerly Double B/21) back in March. With 21 members in tow (yes, 21!), some viewed APeace as a science experiment gone horribly wrong, one that created a monster with the numbers of Super Junior and SNSD combined. Kpop fans flooded forums with their displeasure at the high number of members. Some wondered how all 21 of them get paid. Others complained about not being able to see them all. And still others lamented having to learn all of their names.

I have to confess, I like APeace. I like their single, Lover Boy. I find it to be a great dance song. But what can prepare you for the music video for Lover Boy? It makes me absolutely giddy, and it has everything to do with the fact that there are eventually 21 of them dancing on the screen at one time!

Maybe I like this video so much because it brings back memories of being in a marching band. I especially like the move at :41, which I’m sure will be come the international sign for “baby girl.” However, beyond my potential fangirl-y reaction to APeace, I do think that they learn from some of the challenges that other mega groups like Super Junior face, and, as a result, could make it work.

Mega groups mean mega profits for agencies, as they can strategically place members in multiple places at once, so it makes sense from their point of view. Clearly, SM Entertainment did not foresee how attached fans would get to the initial membership of a mega group like Super Junior. Now, before we get started, I like Super Junior, so I want all the ELFs to take a deep breath. I am not hating on Super Junior, but there are some things that we all know to be true. For instance, all was well in Super Junior land back in 2007 until SM Entertainment started making noises about adding more members, like Henry, to the already super large Super Junior. This prompted some fans to take action to protect the membership. Asianbite.com featured a story about fan protests over the plan. One fan stated, “We do not want Henry or anyone else to be added in Super Junior. We want Super Junior to be a safe 13-membered group.”  I believe that some of this anxiety came from the fact that fans perceived the membership of Super Junior to be set, and that the addition of Henry was not something they signed up for. As a fan, you would wonder whether or if the additions would stop.  SM Entertainment could just keep adding members, with no end in sight. However, APeace avoids this by hitting you with 21 members up front. 21 is a large number, so if you accept that APeace has 21 members, you are not likely to have anxiety about the possibility for additional members. If they added more members (gasp!), would it really be that big of a deal?

The creation of subgroups by SM Entertainment to capitalize on as many markets as possible contributes to even more anxiety around the mega group. Hey, when you are working with 10 to 13 people, you have options. But sometimes these subgroups cause challenges of their own, especially for new fans. I encountered Super Junior M before I encountered Super Junior, so I didn’t understand the relationship between the subgroups and the main group. I could not understand why I couldn’t find Henry or Zhou Mi in what I have come to call Super Junior Proper.  And don’t get me started on the guest status of Sungmin and Eunhyuk in Super Junior M right now. Are there more subgroups on the horizon? One never knows with SM Entertainment. However, APeace has the foresight to establish their subgroups up front. According to their official website, we can look forward to APeace Lapis, APeace Jade and APeace Onyx, three subgroups with seven members each. This move avoids fan disappointment and confusion.

The number of members and the subgroups are not the only things that causes anxiety in fans in relation to a mega group. One of my issues with Super Junior is the presence of the membership of Super Junior at any given time. When a news story runs that Super Junior will make an appearance, can you really be sure who is going to show up? How often do you see all of them together? Yes, we know that Kangin has a good excuse, as he is doing his military service, but when was the last time you saw Kibum? Is he even still in this group? I miss him.  This inability to predict which members of the group participate in group activities is in part linked to the busy schedules of individual members, and this is a problem for me. I was introduced to Super Junior as a group. I kinda expect them to act like the other groups I like.  You know, to be together, to show up, together. Sometimes, it just seems that they are individual artists who get together once in a while and make music. However, I don’t even expect APeace to function as a group in that way because they are rolling 21 deep. I’m not looking for them to have a deep bond with each other. I don’t know APeace, but I don’t feel that I’m expected to know them individually in this 21-member unit. Yes, I vaguely remember them introducing themselves, but who remembers that? I remember them being introduced as a 21-member group, so I don’t invest in their group dynamic, as I did with SS501 or SHINee. APeace, with its large numbers, lowers your expectations about the interaction among the members. I see them more as individual artists who come together to form the mini-nation that is APeace every once and a while. So if fans rarely expect to see them all together, then they are less likely to be disappointed.

I guess this is why I’m not up in arms about APeace. I know I won’t convince a lot of you that bigger is better, but that’s not my goal. What I am saying is that creating a viable model for a large Kpop group is worth exploring. Whatever you think of APeace or any other mega group coming down the turnpike, it takes a certain amount of expertise to promote a mega group. Somebody had to arrange 21 voices on a track. Somebody had to choreograph a dance for 21 people, and I think APeace pulls it off. They are so in sync, a friend of mine thought it was a special effect. Somebody had to film 21 people in motion. There is something to be said for the people who work behind the scenes and for the members of mega groups themselves. You try doing anything with 21 people.

Sources:

“Super Junior Fans Protest Against Addition of New Member,” Asianbite.com

Profile, apeace.jp

Photo Credits: thehottestprimadonna

Video Credits:

APeace, Lover Boy, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mvUuSfXlA7I

One Agency To Rule Them All?

Originally published on hellokpop on July 14, 2011

On June 24, 2011 several high-profile idols, including Kim Hyun Joong, Super Junior, TVXQ and 2PM gathered to help launch United Asia Management, an agency that represents a collaboration among the top Korean agencies, including SM Entertainment, YG Entertainment and JYP Entertainment. While this may be a great way to pool resources to extend the global reach of Kpop, the collaboration could also worsen some of more suspect elements of Korean idol system.

This isn’t the first time that the major Korean agencies have collaborated on a project. Last year, The Big Three and other companies embarked on a joint venture, Korean Music Power Holdings, that would focus on the production of programs and digital music distribution. United Asia Management could also expand all the things we love about Kpop.

Before you get all up in arms, this is not a praise party for The Big Three. I do not own stock in any of them. Actually, a lot of my most favorite groups are not represented by them. We’ll get to the critique of how they do business later in the editorial. Whether you like or dislike them, the fact is they are responsible for a sizable amount of the Kpop you and I listen to. Often, fans complain about what they see as exploitation of the artists. Yes, there is a school of thought out there that says that anytime you have one group of people doing the work and one group of people making profit off of that work, you will automatically get exploitation. However, there is another school of thought that says even when you have one group of people managing another group of people who do the work, the people who do the work consent to do the work because they are comfortable with what they get out of it. In other words, artists do have some agency–they do choose to be idols and we have to leave room for the possibility that they know what they are getting into. This is particularly true now that we’ve had so many other artists enter the idol system. New recruits have more of an idea of what to expect because they can look at the careers of other artists. It is too simplistic to go with either one of these positions; the reality is  probably somewhere in between for any given artist at any given time. Here’s my point: The Big Three can give a glimpse into how United Asia Management could treat its artists and affect fans around the world, both for good and ill.

Even if you think it is evil incarnate, the fact is that SM Entertainment represents a model for the global promotion of Kpop. They have international Kpop cred, having produced a number of successful Kpop artists, including  BoA, SNSD, SHINee, Super Junior, and TVXQ. These aren’t just one-hit wonders, getting their 15 minutes of fame and then disappearing into the night. They all share the distinction of sustaining successful careers since their debut. SM Entertainment is doing something right, something that others are eager to know. Before his resignation, Lee Soo Man gave a lecture to business school students from Stanford University on “theory of CT (Culture Technology)” as well as “the aspects of SM Entertainment’s successful globalization and business management strategies.” It also hard to dispute SM Entertainment’s high-profile presence in international markets, such as its two recent shows in Paris or its previous show in Los Angeles. If United Asia Management could reproduce this on a global scale, it would be groundbreaking for Kpop. Artists would be able to travel to more countries. Kpop could go to far more places, both figuratively and literally. The prospect of international fans seeing their favorite artists in the flesh increases tremendously. If individual agencies represent a town, a family and a nation, then United Asia Management would be its own solar system. The collaboration represented by United Asia Management could also allow artists to directly compete with one another by erasing to a certain extent the individual agency identifications. Also, fans could be treated to more collaborations between artists with a de-emphasis on agency affiliation. Imagine joint projects by some of your favorite Kpop artists.  Let’s face it, sometimes the agencies, in trying to get attention for their artists, engage in tactics designed to get fans to choose, not just among artists, but among the agencies themselves. For example, JYP Entertainment consciously branded itself, just like SM Entertainment and YG Entertainment, to promote concerts and artists overseas. But, agencies do not give fans names and assign fan colors. Fans are fans of artists. With no individual agency jockeying for their loyalty, fans can focus on the artists.

At the same time, United Asia Management could face the same problems faced by The Big Three on a larger scale. With great power comes great responsibility, and it is hard to miss how often artists sue, leave or generally criticize their treatment by large companies like SM Entertainment. asiafanatics.net points to the common complaints by fans regarding SM Entertainment’s treatment of its artists, including a vindictive attitude towards and exploitation of artists and generally unfair business practices.With potentially more money at stake, United Asia Management could operate in the same way, especially with even more artists at its disposal. We could see more stories and more instances of friction between management and artists.

United Asia Management’s collaboration with The Big Three could also result in a drop in the variety of artists we see in Kpop. SM Entertainment, YG Entertainment and JYP Entertainment represent different flavors of Kpop, seeking to cater to different audiences. By bringing all The Big Three under United Asia Management, those differences could be erased, resulting in a whole lot of Kpop that sounds the same and possibly fewer artists overall.  It is also unclear how this large-scale collaboration would affect smaller entertainment agencies who have solid artists of their own. Some of the more up-and-coming artists are not always found in The Big Three. BEAST and A Pink are with Cube Entertainment.  DSP has KARA. NH Media has UKISS. FNC Media, a subsidiary of Core Contents Media, which is Mnet Media’s primary entertainment management label, has FT Island and CN Blue. Could these companies continue to survive, or would UAM just squeeze them out? And what happens to the variety of artists they bring to the table?

Who knows? I really think it could go either way. I guess we will have to watch and see how United Asia Management actually operates. I mean, the one agency could unite them all for good or evil.

Sources:

allkpop.com, Major entertainment companies establish joint venture KMP Holdings

allkpop.com, Lee Soo Man gives a Hallyu lecture to visiting Stanford university students

allkpop.com, JYP Entertainment family titles itself “JYP Nation”

asiafanatics.net, SM’s Court Verdict Refutation Unleashes A Flood Of Criticism From The Public

Photo Credits: soohyundreamer.blogspot.com, oneasiaa.wordpress.com

Video Credits:

Ystar, United Asia Management Red Carpet, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dRloFhFHin0