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Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 4 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titledFor Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, and Part 3 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Global Impact

Dator, Jim. and Yongseok Seo. (2004). Korea as the wave of a future: The emerging dream society of icons
and aesthetic experience. Journal of Futures Studies 9(1): 31–44. Accessed 27 March 2012 from http://www.jfs.tku.edu.tw/9-1/04.pdf?referer=www.clickfind.com.au

Cho, Hae Joang. (2005). Reading the “Korean Wave” as a Sign of Global Shift.  Korea Journal 45: 147–82. Accessed 27 March 2012 from http://www.ekoreajournal.net/issue/view_pop.htm?Idx=3359

Mangliankay, Roald. (2006). When the Korean wave ripples. IIAS Newsletter, 42: 15. Accessed 27 March 2014 from https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/12766/IIAS_NL42_15.pdf?sequence=1

Yang-hwan, Jeong. (2007). Comics soar as new Korean wave. Korea focus on current topics, 15(1):67-69. Accessed 27 March 2014 from http://www.koreafocus.or.kr/images/upload/pdf/101439.pdf

Shin, Hyunjoon. (2009). Have you ever seen the Rain? And who’ll stop the Rain?: the globalizing project of Korean pop (Kpop). Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 10(4): 507-523.

 Globalization

Nederveen Pieterse, Jan. (1995). Globalization as hybridization. In M. Featherstone, S. Lash and R. Robertson (Eds.) Global Modernities. pp.45 – 68. London: Sage.Cho, Uhn. 2005. Positioning the Korean wave in the nexus between globalization and localization. Korea Journal, 45(4): 143-146.

Lee, Hee-Eun. (2005). Othering ourselves: identity and globalization in Korean popular music, 1992-2002. Thesis, University of Iowa.(see also, Identity and Nationalism)

Kim, Youna. (2005). Experiencing globalization. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 8(4): 445-463.

Kim, Ju Young. (2007). Rethinking media flow under globalisation: rising Korean wave and Korean TV and film policy since 1980s. PhD thesis, University of Warwick. Accessed 27 March 2014 from http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/1153/1/WRAP_THESIS_Kim_2007.pdf

Seo, Yongseok. (2006). East Asian response to the globalization of culture: perceptional change and cultural policy. In J. Dator, Dick Pratt and Yongseok Soo (Eds.) Fairness, globalization and public institutions: East Asia and beyond. X: University of Hawai’i Press. pp. 319 – X. (see also, Culture)

Yang, J. (2007). Globalization, nationalism and regionalization: The case of Korean popular culture. Development and Society, 36(2): 177-199.

Sung, Sang Yeon. (2008). Globalization and the regional flow of popular music: the role of the Korean wave (Hanliu) in the construction of Taiwanese identities and Asian values. Thesis, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Le, Lan Xuan. (2009). Imaginaries of the Asian modern: text and context at the juncture of nation and region. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  

Ryoo,  W.   (2009).  Globalization,  or  the  logic  of cultural  hybridization:  The  case  of the  Korean  wave.  Asian Journal  of Communication,  19(2),  137 -15I .

Iwabuchi, Koichi. (2010). Globalization, East Asian media cultures and their politics. Asian Journal of Communication, 20(2): 197-212.

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 3 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled “For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 and Part 2 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Culture

Iwabuchi, Koichi, Stephen Muecke, & Mandy Thomas. (2004). Rogue Flows: Trans-Asian Cultural Traffic. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Kim, J.H. (2004). Korean wave in Japanese culture. Journal of Human Subjectivity, 4(1): 85-95. 

Park, Jung-sun. (2004). Korean American youth and transnational flows of popular culture across the Pacific. Amerasia Journal, 30(1): 147-169.

Fu Su Yin, Kelly, and Kai Khiun Liew. (2005).  “Hallyu in Singapore: Korean Cosmopolitanism or the Consumption of Chineseness?” Korean Journal 45.4: 206-32.

Iwabuchi, Koichi. (2005). Discrepant intimacy: Popular culture flows in East Asia. In J.N. Erni and S.K. Chua (Eds.) Asian Media Studies: Politics of Subjectivities. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Jeon, G. and T. Yoon. (2005). Realizing the Korean wave into an Asiatic flow. Korean Journal of Broadcasting

Kwon, Haesoo and Chai Wonho. (2005). The diffusion of Korean Wave (Hallyu) as a cultural exchange. In 2005 Proceedings of the International Conference of Seoul Association for Public Administration (SAPA). pp. 1 -20.

Lee, Keehyeung. (2005). Assessing and Situating ‘the Korean Wave’ (Hallyu) through a Cultural Studies Lens. Asian Communication Research, 2(2): 5-22. Abstract assessed 2 November 2011. http://www.dbpia.co.kr/view/ar_view.asp?arid=1030476

Park, J.S. (2005). The Korean Wave: Transnational cultural flows in Northeast Asia. In C.K. Armstrong, G. Rozman, S.S. Kim & S. Kotkin (Eds.), Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia. London: M.E. Sharpe, Inc.

Lee, Heejae. (2005). The Korean wave on the viewpoint of Hwa-Yi (China-Barbarism). First International Conference of the Asian Philosophical Association. pp.117 – 124. Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.icapa2005.fatih.edu.tr/icapa2005.pdf#page=125

Lee, Jamie Shinhee. (2005). Discourses of fusion and crossing: Pop culture in Korea and Japan. Thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Kim, Shin Dong. (2006). Mass culture of/in Korea. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://his.hallym.ac.kr/site/user_up/file/2006_s9.doc

 Seo, Yongseok. (2006). East Asian response to the globalization of culture: perceptional change and cultural policy. In J. Dator, Dick Pratt and Yongseok Soo (Eds.) Fairness, globalization and public institutions: East Asia and beyond. X: University of Hawai’i Press. pp. 319 – X. 

Kim, Eun Mee. (2007). South Korean culture goes global?: Kpop and the Korean wave. Presented at the University of California, Los Angeles International Institute. Accessed 28 August 2012 from http://www.international.ucla.edu/calendar/showevent.asp?eventid=6106

Kim, Eun Mee and Jiwon Ryoo. (2007). South Korean culture goes global: Kpop and the Korean wave. Korean Social Science Journal, 34(1): 117-152. Retrieved from http://kossrec.org/board/imgfile/KSSJ%20Vol.34.no.1(Eun%20Mee%20Kim%26Jiwon%20Ryoo)).pdf

Kim, Jeongmee. (2007). Why does hallyu matter? The significance of the Korean wave in South Korea. Critical Studies in television: scholarly studies in small screen fictions, 2(2): 47-59.

Xuenzhe, Liu. (2007). The rising Korean wave among Chinese youth. Accessed 23 November 2011 from http://fxqw820.tripod.com/AWS.pdf

Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong (2008). The New Korean Wave of U. In Anheier, Helmut K. & Isar, Yudhishthir Raj (Eds.) Cultures and Globalization : The cultural economy. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA

Ko, Y.J. (2008). Riding with the Korean wave: Reflections on trans-Asian cultural flows. Paper presented at the New Media and Global Diaspora Symposium. Accessed 28 March 2012 from http://reasonandrespect.rwu.edu/journal/index.php/2009/05/26/riding-with-the-korean-wave-reflections-on-trans-asian-cultural-flows/

Vuong, Phuong My. (2008). Korean wave: cultural influence upon China. Thesis, Concordia University Irvine.

Jung, Eun-Young. (2009). Transnational Korea: A critical assessment of the Korean wave in Asia and in the United States. Southeast Review of Asian Studies, 31: 69-80. Accessed 2 November 2011 fromhttp://www.uky.edu/Centers/Asia/SECAAS/Seras/2009/06_Jung_2009.pdf 

Kim, Sujeong. (2009). Interpreting transnational cultural practices. Cultural Studies, 23(5/6): 736-755.

Lee, Jung-yup. (2009). Managing the transnational, governing the national: Cultural policy and the politics of “culture archetype” project in South Korea. Accessed 5 April 2012 from http://sonicscape.koreanpop.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/jylee-culture-archetype-20090704.pdf

Leung, L.Y. M. (2009). Daejanggeum as ‘affective mobilization’: Lessons for (transnational) popular culture and civil society. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 10(1): 51-66.

Ayhan, Kadir. (2010). The nexus between East Asian regionalization and popular culture: the case of the Korean wave. Seoul National University (thesis).Retrieved from http://library.snu.ac.kr/site/snu/viewer/SNUPDFViewer.jsp?cid=3387447&moi=1778232&file=2415694

Chua, Beng Huat. (2010). Korean pop culture. Malaysian Journal of Media Studies, 12(1): 15-24. Accessed 4 April 2012 from http://umepublication.um.edu.my/filebank/published_article/621/JPMM%202010_1%20Chua%20Beng%20Huat.pdf

Park, Sora. (2010). The impact of media use  and cultural exposure on the mutual perception of Koreans and Japanese. Asian Journal of Communication, 15(2): 173-187.

Bergen, Hannah N. (2011). Understanding Korean society through popular music. Situations, 5 (Winter): 82-90. Accessed 16 April 2012 from http://web.yonsei.ac.kr/bk21/2011%EB%85%84Situations%ED%8C%8C%EC%9D%BC/7_Hannah_Bergen_01[1].pdf

Lee, Dong-Yeon. (2011). “What Is Idol Pop?” In IDOL: From H.O.T. to SNSD, Idol Culture Report, edited by Lee Dong-Yeon, 14–48. Seoul: Imagine.

Ravikesh. (2011). A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Korean Wave (Hallyu) in South Asia. Presented at the The 3rd International Conference on Language and Communication, Bangkok Thailand.

Ramesh, Bharadwaj. A Hallyu Story: Behind the origins and success of the Korean wave in China & the future of content in a broadband world. Accessed 28 March 2011 from http://www.docstoc.com/docs/27504249/A-Hallyu-Story

Katsiaficus, George. Asia and South Korean social movements. Accessed 4 April 2012 from http://tainguyenso.vnu.edu.vn/jspui/bitstream/123456789/7550/1/Hoi%20thao%20Han%20quocTB3-03.pdf

Yasumoto, Seiko. n.d. Japan and Korea as a source of media and cultural capital. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://rp-www.arts.usyd.edu.au/korean/downloads/KSAA2009/Global_Korea_Proceedings_311-321_Yasumoto.pdf

Cultural Industry

Otmazgin, Nissim Kadosh. (2005). Cultural commodities and regionalization in East Asia. Contemporary Southeast Asia, 3: 499-523.

Park, J. B. (2005). Expanding and sustaining ‘Korean Wave’: by the way of developing killer contents. Korean Wave 2005! – Opportunities and Challenges, Seoul, Korea, Korean Wave Promotions & Policies Foundation.

Kim, Youna. (2006). ‘Rising East Asia ‘Wave’: Korean media go global’, in  Thussu,  Daya  (ed.).  Media  on  the  Move:  Global  Flow  and  Contra  Flow, London: Routledge, pp. 135-152.  

Arcodia, C., X Zhiang, D. Sohn & T. Lee. (2008). The sustainable development of the Korean cultural entertainment industry with the Korean wave (Hallyu). Sun Yat-Sen University. (more information: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:160019)

Park, Kang Ah. (2008). The growth of the cultural industry and the role of government: the case of Korea. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45761

Shim, Doobo. (2008). The growth of Korean cultural industries and the Korean wave. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 15 – 32. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press.

Kim, Milim. (2011).The role of the government in cultural industry: Some observations from Korea’s experience. Keio Communication Review, 33: 163- 182. Accessed 4 April 2012 from http://www.mediacom.keio.ac.jp/publication/pdf2011/10KIM.pdf

Otmazgin, Nissim. (2011). A tail that wags the dog? Cultural industry and cultural policy in Japan and South Korea. Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, 13(3): 307-325. doi: 10.1080/13876988.2011.565916

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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Keeping the ‘L’ in digital: Applying LIS Core Competencies to Digital Humanities Work

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S. • University of South Carolina Lancaster

ABSTRACT: Digital Humanities (DH) has struggled with an identity since its contemporary emergence in the early 2000s; however, a succinct definition exists, placing many core activities of the field squarely in the domain of modern librarianship. This article briefly reviews American Library Association’s Core Competencies for Librarianship and summarizes the continuing development and characteristics of DH projects. The author also reveals how LIS competencies have been applied to a Korean popular culture DH project at Elon University.  Positive implications for DH’s impact on professional development for librarians, information literacy integration, and opportunities for librarian/faculty or community collaborations are also included.

Read more:  http://bit.ly/14r4QeQ

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 2 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu. From here on, entries will be arranged by SUBJECT rather than format (e.g., books).  These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled “For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’m modifying these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Business

Ha,  Y.  G.  (2006).  The  plans  for  Korean  entertainment  businesses  concerning  with the  Korean  Wave.  KBI  Focus,  6(17),  6-17

Lee, Jong-ho and Ok, Jung-won and Woo, Do-kang. (2007). The Study on Relationship of Structure among Brand Equity Factors of Hallyu. Business and Economy Studies,25: 73-96.

Yoon, Jung Keun. (2009). A case of slavery contract between singers and agency in Korea: 2009 KaHap2869. The Asian Business Lawyer, 5(123): 123-? Accessed 4 April 2012 from http://210.101.116.28/W_kiss61/1f501057_pv.pdf (partial scan).

Wenqing, Ji. 2009. Referring Korean experiences to enable the Chinese wind to outdo the “Korean Wave.”

Economics

Jung, H. (2006). The effects of consumer’s perception of Korean wave (Hallyu) on Korean product purchase and country image in Chinese market. Journal of Consumer Studies, 17(3): 79-101. (see also, Culture)

Doshisha, Yagi. (2008). International cultural exchange and economic impact. Accessed 29 March 2012 from http://yagi.doshisha.ac.jp/culture/Culturalexchange_final[1].pdf

Huang, Xiaowei. (2009). Korean wave – the popular culture, comes as both cultural and economic imperialism in the East Asia. Asian Social Science, 5(8). Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://www.ccsenet.org/journal/index.php/ass/article/view/3449/3123

Lee, J-Y. (2009). Contesting the digital economy and culture: digital technologies and the transformation of popular music in Korea. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 10(4): 489-506.

Oh, I. (2009). Hallyu: the rise of transnational cultural consumers in China and Japan. Korea Observer, 40(3): 425-459. 

Ha, Bongjoon. (2010).  Developing research framework and scales for the Korean Wave’s effects: An application in Malaysia. Malaysian Journal of Media Studies, 12 (1): 53-60. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://biomed2011.um.edu.my/filebank/published_article/623/JPMM%202010_1%20Ha,%20Bongjoon.pdf

Ha, Bongjoon. (2006). Developing research framework and scales for the Korean Wave’s effects: An application in Malaysia. Broadcast International Seminar on Southeast Asia and Korea, 7:1-87.) 

Kim, Myung Oak and Sam Jaffe. (2010). The Korean wave: ebbing or flowing? In M.O. Kim and S. Jaffe The new Korea: An inside look at South Korea’s economic rise. pp. 163- 174, Accessed 26 April 2013 from http://www.cognitivestyles.com/GINA_PCA/Korean%20History%20Etc/The%20New%20Korea%20An%20Inside%20Look%20at%20South%20Korea’s%20Economic%20Rise.pdf

Ahn, Shin-Hyun. (2011). Girls’ Generation and the New Korean Wave. SERI Quarterly, 4(4): 80-86.

Kim, Jeong Gon and Se Young Ahn. (n.d.). Patterns and impacts of Korea’s cultural exports: Focused on East Asia. Accessed 22 August 2012 from
*http://home.sogang.ac.kr/sites/iias/iias04/Lists/b6/Attachments/52/6.%20Patterns_and_Impacts_of_Korea%20(Se%20Young%20Ahn_Jeong%20Gon%20Kim).docx 

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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Manse in the USA!: What K-pop Means in the United States

April 12, 2013 ♦ Binghamton University

Crystal S. Anderson, PhD ♦ Elon University

Despite its status as a subculture, Korean popular music of the Hallyu era (K-pop) has a significant cultural impact in the United States. Combining elements of Korean and other cultures, it appeals to fans of varying ages and ethnicities. Using surveys and analysis of online K-pop culture originating in the United States, this paper will show that hybridization explains the appeal of and the backlash against K-pop. K-pop appeals to American fans because it is simultaneously similar to and different from American popular culture. American fans recognize elements of American culture and they embrace Korean cultural elements. At the same time, critiques of K-pop in the United States target those very elements, mocking K-pop and its fans for the ways they diverge from mainstream American cultural norms. For many in the United States, K-pop represents a complex negotiation with a Korean global culture.

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S

University of South Carolina Lancaster

When you click the “KPK Members” link on our site, our bios’ upbeat language states we have certain skill sets that match well with the work of KPK, and you know that we are Kpop fans. I think our identification as Kpop fans is one of the unique characteristics of our collaboration.

While KPK members approach the work of KPK as people who truly enjoy and participate in Kpop culture and some associated activities, our passion for Kpop is a minimum requirement for the work we do. Our work also requires the courage to forge a path in a niche research area within a discipline that is still developing, a willingness to perform due diligence, and not unlike the most successful Kpop idols, the will to perform seemingly repetitive actions in pursuit of a professional and cohesive body of work for an audience who’d like to consume a quality product.

This past January, KPK marked its second anniversary, and in that time we have improved our artist profiles and expanded our research projects. In the same amount of time, the DH discipline still struggles with its very identity – literally. In a recent article in The Chronicle of Higher Education, William Pannapacker (with KPK’s apologies) pleads:

Stop calling it “digital humanities.” Or worse, “DH,” with a knowing air. The backlash against the field has already arrived. The DH’ers have always known that their work is interdisciplinary (or metadisciplinary), but many academics who are not humanists think they’re excluded from it….it seems more inclusive to call it digital liberal arts (DLA) with the assumption that we’ll lose the “digital” within a few years, once practices that seem innovative today become the ordinary methods of scholarship.

DH (or DLA) labels aside, KPK is performing the unique work of organizing Kpop artist information and Kpop fan activities during a time when DH standards are wide-ranging and many actions that were once considered within the discipline have been challenged as the field evolves. When KPK considers adding new projects or updating current ones, we revisit the evolving rules of DH and work to reconcile them with the KPK educational mission. Because of this evolution, our passion for Kpop (“let’s gather every single photo we can find of Eric because Shinhwa is awesome!”) has always been tempered by the scholastic/research activity of due diligence (“which photos of Shinhwa reflect a certain aspect of the group’s position in/influence on Hallyu’s development”). Burdick et al. assert that one of the characteristics of DH is “an emphasis upon curation as a defining feature of scholarly practice” (2012, 122). KPK’s projects reflect this characteristic because of our ongoing commitment to adhere to the latest standards where we can, and to question any standards that seem exclusionary to scholars who are doing good works in unconventional DH environments.

Hand-in-hand with due diligence is the time it takes to seek, evaluate, master,  train others, and implement new technologies and curate our information so KPK’s work can be made public and is easily disseminated. When we started KPK two years ago, we used two tools for content creation: WordPress and Google Docs. As our work evolved towards curation, we discovered more tools and applied them to our work.  More recently, KPK members have been trained on or exposed to a variety of digital curation platforms, including Omeka, Timeline JS, and Mindomo.

While these technologies make information gathering and presentation easier, it still takes quite a while to get work done. For instance, it takes about 4 hours to gather and curate all the items for the average KPK artist profile, and another 2 hours to input the items into KPOPIANA. That doesn’t take into account how long it takes to set up the artist’s exhibit. Since a lot of Kpop information is strewn all over the Internet (and in some cases, is contradictory or not available at all), this work can be tedious and repetitive – especially if you’re working on an artist that you don’t know well (or know, but who is not your favorite). Add this time to the hours we spend tagging and adding news to our information archive, annotating interesting articles, locating scholarly work, talking to fans, and preparing data for presentations, it becomes quickly apparent that my while my enjoyment of Kpop helps me get the job done,  it isn’t the actual work of KPK.

The interesting thing is this: when I’m looking for information about an artist who I don’t know that much about; watching a music video of a group that makes me wonder how they ever made even one comeback; or analyzing a concept photo that leaves me questioning the entire cordi-noona empire –that is when my passion for Kpop kicks in, melds with my love of scholarship, and stokes my determination to get our work done right for the long-term fulfillment of the KPK mission.

Sources

Burdick, Anne, et al. Digital Humanities. Cambridge: MIT Press, 2012. Web.

Pannapacker, William. “Stop Calling it ‘Digital Humanities’.” The Chronicle of Higher Education. 18 Feb. 2013. Web. 5 Mar 2013.

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Kaetrena Davis Kendrick was interviewed about how she uses the scholarly social networking site, Academia.edu, as a tool for promotion and tenure – and how she uses it as a tool to locate scholars working on Korean popular culture:

“By cultivating an international following on Academia.edu, Kendrick has developed networks that span across disciplines and cultures, which have directly benefitted her collaborative work in digital humanities as well as her own research in international librarianship.

Working within a very small area of scholarship, Kendrick has been involved in the Kpop Kollective, a digital humanities project on Hallyu (Korean Wave) popular culture…”

Read more at the Academia.edu blog

IFansOmekalogo

IFANS: Mapping K-pop’s International Fandom is a scholarly research project that examines global fan attitudes and activities through surveys, collection of information on online communities and analysis of websites.  Crystal S. Anderson, PhD (Elon University) is the Principal Investigator of the studies and Curator of the iFans project site.

Read the rest of this entry »

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Last month I shared why my background in Library and Information Science matches so well with the mission and work of KPK: Kpop Kollective.  One of the roles I play is information provider (billed “Research and Information Clearinghouse” on that fine chart from last month’s blog). More and more frequently, visitors to our site are government employees, graduate students, and university faculty members from all over the world who have a strong academic interest in Hallyu. Since July 2011, I have been collecting and organizing citations of conference presentations, scholarly articles, book chapters and books covering all aspects of Hallyu, including popular music, television, fans, and more.  In an upcoming series of posts, I’ll be sharing with you unannotated citations of items that I’ve discovered as I’ve mined information.

Venn diagrams of BOOLEAN Operator results. Created by Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S. for KPK: Kpop Kollective.

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Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

This past May I presented at a Library and Information Science (LIS) conference to talk with my colleagues about how I am using my professional skills at KPK (and why they should do similar work). If you browse the KPK site, you will quickly come across the essays and Shout Outs pieces I’ve published, and my main projects –Digital Documentation, News Archiving, and KPK Intern training — rely heavily on the data mining, information organization, and emerging technology skills and tools I’ve honed and come across in my work as an academic librarian.

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Unconfirmed Super Show World Tour dates list (Source:http://bit.ly/srAjih); Ryeowook as “Gollum” during Super Show 4 in Seoul (November 2011) Source: beautifulEUNSIHAE86 on Youtube

By Crystal S. Anderson, PhD and Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

RIVENDELL (AHMN) – E.L.F.s have started to gather for Super Junior’s Super Show 4, to be held in the biggest tree in the elven city.  Armed with their sapphire blue lightsticks, legions of fans look forward to cheering on the group at the history-making show.  Super Junior is the first Kpop group to play the Rivendell Celebrian Arena, and rumor has it that SM Entertainment is currently contemplating additional dates in Mordor and Minas Tirith, with the possibility of holding a fanmeet on the Pelennor Fields.

But don’t log on to Ticketmaster just yet. Aren’t you a little skeptical? You should be, because news reporting in the Kpop world sometimes looks just as improbable.  In our investigation of all things Hallyu, KPK has noticed several trends in the way information about Kpop is distributed.  This article is about how Kpop fans are informed, or in some cases, misinformed, by coverage of Kpop. This is not about any one outlet or blogger, and the examples and photos within this article are used to illustrate a trend. They should not be construed as judgements on how individual sites choose to create or distribute kpop news.

Read the rest of this entry »

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U.S. K-pop Fan Survey

Are you a fan of Kpop in the United States? Are you a K-pop fan of color? Make your voice heard in this brief survey for research!

U.S. K-pop Fan Survey

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