The Digital Documentation Project: An Update

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

During KPK’s early days in 2011, Dr. Anderson and other KPK founders were having quite a difficult time accessing some Kpop entertainment companies’ artist websites.  They kept encountering what they called, “the circle of death,” and then timing out. I wasn’t having this problem and had just discovered the Screencast-O-Matic tool, so I decided to record the sites and send the video links to my KPK colleagues.

Interweb troubles in 2011....DD to the rescue!

Interweb troubles in 2011….DD to the rescue!

And that is how the the KPK Digital Documentation (DD) project was born.

While the original intent of my website recordings was to share the Kpop website love, I quickly realized that recording Kpop websites could be useful in other ways: to track changes in Kpop web design, to understand how Korean entertainment companies use websites to engage Korean and international Kpop fans, and what roles these sites seem to play in the company’s larger business, marketing, and promotional plans  – particularly when it comes to attracting new talent and integrating social media channels and tools.

Process

Recording websites can take between 2 to 15 minutes per site- occasionally more if the website is dense.  I choose to record the websites without sound in order to avoid copyright infringement and so that visitors may enjoy and engage in unbiased viewing or analysis of the website.   In Kpop, many artists and groups release several music projects a year, so I keep up with Kpop news outlets to find out about debuts and comebacks, and I try to record the different websites for each project. In this way, the DD project creates depth not only by seeking out general trends, but also monitoring the evolution of individual groups and artists. Additionally, if artists and groups promote in Japan, I record those websites if they are available.

Recording B1A4's latest website. See Screencast-O-Matic interface (dotted lines, recording control panel).

Recording B1A4’s latest website. See Screencast-O-Matic interface (dotted lines, recording control panel).

Website Differences

One of the first things I noticed is that SM Entertainment was the only company that still gave historical access to websites supporting their early artists (Shinhwa, S.E.S., Yoo Joung Jin, etc.), so I quickly recorded those websites. It’s a good thing that I did, because in 2012, the company completely redesigned their website, removing any content about artists who were not currently on their roster.  SM Entertainment continues to allow access to the older websites of groups who are still on their roster (e.g., Girls Generation, SHINee, TVXQ! etc.); additionally this company provides links to modified liner notes (e.g., lyrics, music publishing information, etc.).  Those sites have been recorded for posterity, as well.

In contrast, other companies like YG Entertainment or FNC Music Entertainment only offer current editions of artists websites – that is, viewers only have access to the current promotional concept of a group or artist, even if some historical information may be available (see below). Additionally, some companies (Starship Entertainment, TS Entertainment) only offer quick profile information about their artists on their websites. Instead they choose to use Cafe Daum’s “internet cafe” sites, which act as a hybrid website/forum, to promote their artists. Since Cafe Daum Official Kpop artist sites are generally designed to reach Korean Kpop fans, I do not record these sites for KPK.

Website Commonalities

Despite these differences, most Kpop artist websites have common elements:

  • Artist profiles (member names, birthdays, blood type, hobbies)
  • Discography lists
  • Photo galleries
  • Music snippets
  • Activity calendars
  • Social media links (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, and until mid-2014, Me2day)
  • Links to online music purchasing and downloading sites (e.g., Melon, Olleh, iTunes)
  • Message boards (from the artists, their staff, and for fan-to-fan communication)
  • Official fanclub portals and exclusive content (often password protected)
  • International language options (default language is Korean with some English)
  • Links to the company’s business site, which include audition information

From Collection to Curation

B1A4 Kpopiana exhibit with Digital Documentation links.

B1A4 Kpopiana exhibit with Digital Documentation links.

When this project first began, KPK members were more engaged in collecting information, so DD videos were listed on the KPK website, separately from the artist profiles. As we move on to curation activities, these video links are now included in KPOPIANA artist exhibits.  At press time, KPK has a DD library of almost 500 Kpop artist websites, from all kinds of Korean entertainment companies and encompassing all kinds of artists, Kpop choreographers, some international fansites,  and even Kdrama actors. Currently we are focused on releasing DD items pertaining to Kpop artists, with plans to include other items in the future.   The Library of Congress (n.d.) notes that the average length of a website is about 44 days. Considering the frenetic pace of music production in Kpop, this length may sometimes be shortened, making the DD project a useful tool in the study of Hallyu and its life on the Internet.  

 Click to learn more about the DD project, or you may contact me anytime.

Sources

Library of Congress. (n.d.). Importance of digital preservation: Special presentation. Accessed April 17, 2014, from http://www.digitalpreservation.gov/about/presentation.html.

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 4: GLOBAL IMPACT and GLOBALIZATION

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 4 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titledFor Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 , Part 2, and Part 3 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Global Impact

Dator, Jim. and Yongseok Seo. (2004). Korea as the wave of a future: The emerging dream society of icons
and aesthetic experience. Journal of Futures Studies 9(1): 31–44. Accessed 27 March 2012 from http://www.jfs.tku.edu.tw/9-1/04.pdf?referer=www.clickfind.com.au

Cho, Hae Joang. (2005). Reading the “Korean Wave” as a Sign of Global Shift.  Korea Journal 45: 147–82. Accessed 27 March 2012 from http://www.ekoreajournal.net/issue/view_pop.htm?Idx=3359

Mangliankay, Roald. (2006). When the Korean wave ripples. IIAS Newsletter, 42: 15. Accessed 27 March 2014 from https://openaccess.leidenuniv.nl/bitstream/handle/1887/12766/IIAS_NL42_15.pdf?sequence=1

Yang-hwan, Jeong. (2007). Comics soar as new Korean wave. Korea focus on current topics, 15(1):67-69. Accessed 27 March 2014 from http://www.koreafocus.or.kr/images/upload/pdf/101439.pdf

Shin, Hyunjoon. (2009). Have you ever seen the Rain? And who’ll stop the Rain?: the globalizing project of Korean pop (Kpop). Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 10(4): 507-523.

 Globalization

Nederveen Pieterse, Jan. (1995). Globalization as hybridization. In M. Featherstone, S. Lash and R. Robertson (Eds.) Global Modernities. pp.45 – 68. London: Sage.Cho, Uhn. 2005. Positioning the Korean wave in the nexus between globalization and localization. Korea Journal, 45(4): 143-146.

Lee, Hee-Eun. (2005). Othering ourselves: identity and globalization in Korean popular music, 1992-2002. Thesis, University of Iowa.(see also, Identity and Nationalism)

Kim, Youna. (2005). Experiencing globalization. International Journal of Cultural Studies, 8(4): 445-463.

Kim, Ju Young. (2007). Rethinking media flow under globalisation: rising Korean wave and Korean TV and film policy since 1980s. PhD thesis, University of Warwick. Accessed 27 March 2014 from http://wrap.warwick.ac.uk/1153/1/WRAP_THESIS_Kim_2007.pdf

Seo, Yongseok. (2006). East Asian response to the globalization of culture: perceptional change and cultural policy. In J. Dator, Dick Pratt and Yongseok Soo (Eds.) Fairness, globalization and public institutions: East Asia and beyond. X: University of Hawai’i Press. pp. 319 – X. (see also, Culture)

Yang, J. (2007). Globalization, nationalism and regionalization: The case of Korean popular culture. Development and Society, 36(2): 177-199.

Sung, Sang Yeon. (2008). Globalization and the regional flow of popular music: the role of the Korean wave (Hanliu) in the construction of Taiwanese identities and Asian values. Thesis, Indiana University, Bloomington.

Le, Lan Xuan. (2009). Imaginaries of the Asian modern: text and context at the juncture of nation and region. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology.  

Ryoo,  W.   (2009).  Globalization,  or  the  logic  of cultural  hybridization:  The  case  of the  Korean  wave.  Asian Journal  of Communication,  19(2),  137 -15I .

Iwabuchi, Koichi. (2010). Globalization, East Asian media cultures and their politics. Asian Journal of Communication, 20(2): 197-212.

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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For Your Reading Pleasure: A Hallyu Bibliography, Part 3: CULTURE and CULTURAL INDUSTRY

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S.

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Welcome to Part 3 of my ongoing series of bibliographic entries about Hallyu.   These entries are listed by year, not by author (TIP: If you know about a title or author and you want to see if it’s included in this listing, use the CTRL +F function).

To learn more about my searching parameters, information-gathering processes, and your ability to access these items, see my earlier essay titled “For Your Reading Pleasure: Introducing A Hallyu Bibliography.”  Click for Part 1 and Part 2 of the bibliography.

This is a working post, so if you would like to submit items to this list or to the bibliography, please contact me directly at kaetrena@mailbox.sc.edu

NOTE:  In order to make it easier to locate authors (and where possible), I’ve modified these APA Style citations by adding full author names where possible.

Culture

Iwabuchi, Koichi, Stephen Muecke, & Mandy Thomas. (2004). Rogue Flows: Trans-Asian Cultural Traffic. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Kim, J.H. (2004). Korean wave in Japanese culture. Journal of Human Subjectivity, 4(1): 85-95. 

Park, Jung-sun. (2004). Korean American youth and transnational flows of popular culture across the Pacific. Amerasia Journal, 30(1): 147-169.

Fu Su Yin, Kelly, and Kai Khiun Liew. (2005).  “Hallyu in Singapore: Korean Cosmopolitanism or the Consumption of Chineseness?” Korean Journal 45.4: 206-32.

Iwabuchi, Koichi. (2005). Discrepant intimacy: Popular culture flows in East Asia. In J.N. Erni and S.K. Chua (Eds.) Asian Media Studies: Politics of Subjectivities. Hong Kong: Hong Kong University Press.

Jeon, G. and T. Yoon. (2005). Realizing the Korean wave into an Asiatic flow. Korean Journal of Broadcasting

Kwon, Haesoo and Chai Wonho. (2005). The diffusion of Korean Wave (Hallyu) as a cultural exchange. In 2005 Proceedings of the International Conference of Seoul Association for Public Administration (SAPA). pp. 1 -20.

Lee, Keehyeung. (2005). Assessing and Situating ‘the Korean Wave’ (Hallyu) through a Cultural Studies Lens. Asian Communication Research, 2(2): 5-22. Abstract assessed 2 November 2011. http://www.dbpia.co.kr/view/ar_view.asp?arid=1030476

Park, J.S. (2005). The Korean Wave: Transnational cultural flows in Northeast Asia. In C.K. Armstrong, G. Rozman, S.S. Kim & S. Kotkin (Eds.), Korea at the Center: Dynamics of Regionalism in Northeast Asia. London: M.E. Sharpe, Inc.

Lee, Heejae. (2005). The Korean wave on the viewpoint of Hwa-Yi (China-Barbarism). First International Conference of the Asian Philosophical Association. pp.117 – 124. Accessed 22 August 2012 from http://www.icapa2005.fatih.edu.tr/icapa2005.pdf#page=125

Lee, Jamie Shinhee. (2005). Discourses of fusion and crossing: Pop culture in Korea and Japan. Thesis, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Kim, Shin Dong. (2006). Mass culture of/in Korea. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://his.hallym.ac.kr/site/user_up/file/2006_s9.doc

 Seo, Yongseok. (2006). East Asian response to the globalization of culture: perceptional change and cultural policy. In J. Dator, Dick Pratt and Yongseok Soo (Eds.) Fairness, globalization and public institutions: East Asia and beyond. X: University of Hawai’i Press. pp. 319 – X. 

Kim, Eun Mee. (2007). South Korean culture goes global?: Kpop and the Korean wave. Presented at the University of California, Los Angeles International Institute. Accessed 28 August 2012 from http://www.international.ucla.edu/calendar/showevent.asp?eventid=6106

Kim, Eun Mee and Jiwon Ryoo. (2007). South Korean culture goes global: Kpop and the Korean wave. Korean Social Science Journal, 34(1): 117-152. Retrieved from http://kossrec.org/board/imgfile/KSSJ%20Vol.34.no.1(Eun%20Mee%20Kim%26Jiwon%20Ryoo)).pdf

Kim, Jeongmee. (2007). Why does hallyu matter? The significance of the Korean wave in South Korea. Critical Studies in television: scholarly studies in small screen fictions, 2(2): 47-59.

Xuenzhe, Liu. (2007). The rising Korean wave among Chinese youth. Accessed 23 November 2011 from http://fxqw820.tripod.com/AWS.pdf

Choi, Jaz Hee-jeong (2008). The New Korean Wave of U. In Anheier, Helmut K. & Isar, Yudhishthir Raj (Eds.) Cultures and Globalization : The cultural economy. Sage Publications, Thousand Oaks, CA

Ko, Y.J. (2008). Riding with the Korean wave: Reflections on trans-Asian cultural flows. Paper presented at the New Media and Global Diaspora Symposium. Accessed 28 March 2012 from http://reasonandrespect.rwu.edu/journal/index.php/2009/05/26/riding-with-the-korean-wave-reflections-on-trans-asian-cultural-flows/

Vuong, Phuong My. (2008). Korean wave: cultural influence upon China. Thesis, Concordia University Irvine.

Jung, Eun-Young. (2009). Transnational Korea: A critical assessment of the Korean wave in Asia and in the United States. Southeast Review of Asian Studies, 31: 69-80. Accessed 2 November 2011 fromhttp://www.uky.edu/Centers/Asia/SECAAS/Seras/2009/06_Jung_2009.pdf 

Kim, Sujeong. (2009). Interpreting transnational cultural practices. Cultural Studies, 23(5/6): 736-755.

Lee, Jung-yup. (2009). Managing the transnational, governing the national: Cultural policy and the politics of “culture archetype” project in South Korea. Accessed 5 April 2012 from http://sonicscape.koreanpop.org/wp-content/uploads/2009/07/jylee-culture-archetype-20090704.pdf

Leung, L.Y. M. (2009). Daejanggeum as ‘affective mobilization’: Lessons for (transnational) popular culture and civil society. Inter-Asia Cultural Studies, 10(1): 51-66.

Ayhan, Kadir. (2010). The nexus between East Asian regionalization and popular culture: the case of the Korean wave. Seoul National University (thesis).Retrieved from http://library.snu.ac.kr/site/snu/viewer/SNUPDFViewer.jsp?cid=3387447&moi=1778232&file=2415694

Chua, Beng Huat. (2010). Korean pop culture. Malaysian Journal of Media Studies, 12(1): 15-24. Accessed 4 April 2012 from http://umepublication.um.edu.my/filebank/published_article/621/JPMM%202010_1%20Chua%20Beng%20Huat.pdf

Park, Sora. (2010). The impact of media use  and cultural exposure on the mutual perception of Koreans and Japanese. Asian Journal of Communication, 15(2): 173-187.

Bergen, Hannah N. (2011). Understanding Korean society through popular music. Situations, 5 (Winter): 82-90. Accessed 16 April 2012 from http://web.yonsei.ac.kr/bk21/2011%EB%85%84Situations%ED%8C%8C%EC%9D%BC/7_Hannah_Bergen_01[1].pdf

Lee, Dong-Yeon. (2011). “What Is Idol Pop?” In IDOL: From H.O.T. to SNSD, Idol Culture Report, edited by Lee Dong-Yeon, 14–48. Seoul: Imagine.

Ravikesh. (2011). A Cross-Cultural Perspective on Korean Wave (Hallyu) in South Asia. Presented at the The 3rd International Conference on Language and Communication, Bangkok Thailand.

Ramesh, Bharadwaj. A Hallyu Story: Behind the origins and success of the Korean wave in China & the future of content in a broadband world. Accessed 28 March 2011 from http://www.docstoc.com/docs/27504249/A-Hallyu-Story

Katsiaficus, George. Asia and South Korean social movements. Accessed 4 April 2012 from http://tainguyenso.vnu.edu.vn/jspui/bitstream/123456789/7550/1/Hoi%20thao%20Han%20quocTB3-03.pdf

Yasumoto, Seiko. n.d. Japan and Korea as a source of media and cultural capital. Accessed 24 August 2012 from http://rp-www.arts.usyd.edu.au/korean/downloads/KSAA2009/Global_Korea_Proceedings_311-321_Yasumoto.pdf

Cultural Industry

Otmazgin, Nissim Kadosh. (2005). Cultural commodities and regionalization in East Asia. Contemporary Southeast Asia, 3: 499-523.

Park, J. B. (2005). Expanding and sustaining ‘Korean Wave': by the way of developing killer contents. Korean Wave 2005! – Opportunities and Challenges, Seoul, Korea, Korean Wave Promotions & Policies Foundation.

Kim, Youna. (2006). ‘Rising East Asia ‘Wave’: Korean media go global’, in  Thussu,  Daya  (ed.).  Media  on  the  Move:  Global  Flow  and  Contra  Flow, London: Routledge, pp. 135-152.  

Arcodia, C., X Zhiang, D. Sohn & T. Lee. (2008). The sustainable development of the Korean cultural entertainment industry with the Korean wave (Hallyu). Sun Yat-Sen University. (more information: http://espace.library.uq.edu.au/view/UQ:160019)

Park, Kang Ah. (2008). The growth of the cultural industry and the role of government: the case of Korea. Thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Accessed 2 November 2011 from http://dspace.mit.edu/handle/1721.1/45761

Shim, Doobo. (2008). The growth of Korean cultural industries and the Korean wave. In C.B. Huat and K. Iwabuchi (Eds.) East Asian Pop Culture: Analyzing the Korean Wave. pp. 15 – 32. Aberdeen: Hong Kong University Press.

Kim, Milim. (2011).The role of the government in cultural industry: Some observations from Korea’s experience. Keio Communication Review, 33: 163- 182. Accessed 4 April 2012 from http://www.mediacom.keio.ac.jp/publication/pdf2011/10KIM.pdf

Otmazgin, Nissim. (2011). A tail that wags the dog? Cultural industry and cultural policy in Japan and South Korea. Journal of Comparative Policy Analysis: Research and Practice, 13(3): 307-325. doi: 10.1080/13876988.2011.565916

Happy Reading!

KDK/Nunee (M.S.L.S.)

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Communities of Practice in Digital Humanities

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S

University of South Carolina Lancaster

Collaboration is an often-cited characteristic of Digital Humanities (DH) projects (Jӧttkandt 2008, Liu 2009; Honn & Morse 2013); however, does that collaboration signal something more? What kinds of relationships are created due to (or outside of) those projects? What other problems are solved as a result of shared work in DH projects? Perhaps some answers to these questions are found in the idea of communities of practice.

Communities of Practice

A simple graphic illustrating the dynamics of a Community of Practice (CoP). Retrieved October 31, 2013 from http://www.orthopaedicsone.com/display/Main/Community+of+Practice

A simple graphic illustrating the dynamics of a Community of Practice (CoP). Retrieved October 31, 2013 from http://www.orthopaedicsone.com/display/Main/Community+of+Practice

Communities of practice (CoP) are groups of people who share a concern, problem, or passion about a topic and who expand their knowledge in these areas by meeting periodically. When they meet, they discuss these concerns, bring questions to the group for insight, introduce and explore new ideas, and share what they have learned with others in the group (Wenger, McDermott and Synder 2002). The ongoing result of CoP is a process of collective education within the context of a shared goal, and that education helps the group improve and resolve issues within their domain of work (Wenger, n.d.).  CoPs also focus on or engage in:

  • common professional interests

  • problem resolution

  • knowledge discovery and sharing

  • assistance in practice

  • building or recognizing synergy and affinity

  • documentation

  • gap-filling

KPK as CoP

In the literature, CoP examples often are illustrated as belonging to the same profession or engaging in similar regular activities: a group of doctors, car thieves, or auto workers working in a manufacturing plant. In contrast, KPK members practice different professions (English professor vs. academic librarianship), but our shared identity as Kpop fans, common work environments (college campuses), similar professional activities (publishing, teaching and learning, service work) and topical concerns (Hallyu preservation and documentation) move us beyond our desire to collaborate on projects like KPOPIANA and bring us into a CoP.  I have found that the KPK CoP is a dual one: our interactions develop our collaborative KPK projects and positively impact our discrete work as college faculty, too.

What is Digital Humanities? All this and more! Retrieved October 31, 2013 from http://dhpraxisf13.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2013/09/20/defining/

What is Digital Humanities? All this and more! Retrieved October 31, 2013 from http://dhpraxisf13.commons.gc.cuny.edu/2013/09/20/defining/

Since DH is constantly changing, KPK members meet virtually and in-person as often as we can to discuss this evolution and how it affects our Hallyu preservation work. These discussions usually center around technology discovery (e.g, “What tools will help us…?”), protocol documentation (e.g. “How should we deal with…?”), and knowledge creation (e.g., “What should we know about…?”). In equal measure, we also are concerned with professional development, scholarship, and pedagogy. More often than not, we have found that many solutions for KPK concerns have also been applicable to our daily practice of teaching or librarianship.  As an example, Dr. Anderson and I originally used Screencast-O-Matic (a screen capture tool) to train KPK members in virtual environments; however, during many conversations about student engagement, we discovered that we were also using the tool in our independent areas of practice: Dr. Anderson uses Screencast-O-Matic to offer feedback to her students, while I use the tool to record best practices for information-seeking during research consultations with students and other faculty.

The Bigger Picture

As a CoP, KPK does not end with its current members. Because of the nature of our work, we are constantly seeking new insight from others who have lay and formal knowledge of Korean popular culture and best practices in DH. While we are a unique project, we want to learn what others are doing, what challenges they have experienced, and how they have overcome these challenges in the pursuit of scholarship and open access to information. We also are keen to collaborate with passionate individuals and groups who are committed to these principles, regardless of the subject matter.

Big Bang Welcome. Retrieved October 31, 2013 from http://kpoprightnow.tumblr.com/

Big Bang Welcome. Retrieved October 31, 2013 from http://kpoprightnow.tumblr.com/

KPK is more than a DH project: it’s a sounding board for the continuous improvement of higher education, a sandbox for pedagogy improvement, a town hall for voicing big ideas, and a warehouse for scholarly production. Our CoP interactions improve KPK’s operations and give us opportunities to enhance our larger academic networks. We take what we learn in our small group and apply that knowledge to training our colleagues, educating students, and increasing access to scholarly communication. In this way, we become progressive thought leaders on our respective campuses and (hopefully) positive influences on communities unknown to us in the first place.  Doesn’t that make for an improved community overall? I think so.

Sources

Honn, J. & Morse, G. (2013). Digital humanities (101). Retrieved May 11, 2013 from http://acrl.ala.org/dh/2013/03/27/digital-humanities-101/

Jӧttkandt, S. (2008). Free/Libre scholarship: Open humanities press. Retrieved from http://openhumanitiespress.org/Jottkandt-03-april-08-Irvine-talk.pdf

Liu, A. (2009). Digital humanities and academic change. English Language Notes, 47(1), 17 – 35.

Wenger, Etienne, McDermott, Richard A., & Snyder, William. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: A guide to managing knowledge. Boston: Harvard Business School Press.

Wenger, Etienne. (n.d.). Communities of practice: a brief introduction. Retrieved October 1, 2013, from https://scholarsbank.uoregon.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/1794/11736/A%20brief%20introduction%20to%20CoP.pdf?sequence=1

Also of Note: The Journal of Digital Humanities’ latest issue focuses on CoPs in the field.

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JOURNAL ARTICLE: Journal of Creative Library Practice

Keeping the ‘L’ in digital: Applying LIS Core Competencies to Digital Humanities Work

Kaetrena Davis Kendrick, M.S.L.S. • University of South Carolina Lancaster

ABSTRACT: Digital Humanities (DH) has struggled with an identity since its contemporary emergence in the early 2000s; however, a succinct definition exists, placing many core activities of the field squarely in the domain of modern librarianship. This article briefly reviews American Library Association’s Core Competencies for Librarianship and summarizes the continuing development and characteristics of DH projects. The author also reveals how LIS competencies have been applied to a Korean popular culture DH project at Elon University.  Positive implications for DH’s impact on professional development for librarians, information literacy integration, and opportunities for librarian/faculty or community collaborations are also included.

Read more:  http://bit.ly/14r4QeQ